I am trying to make my program print out the contents of a vector containing objects of class type Checking
i want it to print the balance of each element in the vector but when i try to use

cout<<checking[1]

all i get is nonsense characters

here is what i have so far
Main

#include "checking.h"
#include "savings.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
   vector < Checking * > checking(50) ;
vector < Savings *> savings(50);
int accNumS = 0, accNumC = 0;
double bal = 0, amt = 0;
while(accNumC < 3)
{
cout << "Enter balance for accont #" << accNumC+1 << ": ";
			cin >> bal;
              	checking[accNumC] = new Checking(accNumC+1,bal);
              	accNumC++;
              	
}              	
cout << checking[1]<<"\n";
cout << checking[2]<<"\n";
cout << checking[3]<<"\n";
    system("pause");
    return 0;
}

account.h(checking inherits from this)

#include "checking.h"
#include "savings.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
   vector < Checking * > checking(50) ;
vector < Savings *> savings(50);
int accNumS = 0, accNumC = 0;
double bal = 0, amt = 0;
while(accNumC < 3)
{
cout << "Enter balance for accont #" << accNumC+1 << ": ";
			cin >> bal;
              	checking[accNumC] = new Checking(accNumC+1,bal);
              	accNumC++;
              	
}              	
cout << checking[1]<<"\n";
cout << checking[2]<<"\n";
cout << checking[3]<<"\n";
    system("pause");
    return 0;
}

account.cpp

// Class automatically generated by Dev-C++ New Class wizard

#include "account.h" // class's header file

// class constructor
Account::Account(int accnum, double accbalance)
{
setAccountNum(accnum);                  
setbalance(accbalance);
}

void Account::setAccountNum(int num)
{
  AccountNum = num;
}
int Account::getAccountNum()
{
  return AccountNum;                      
}
void Account::setbalance(double sbalance)
{
    balance = sbalance;               
} 
double Account::getbalance()
{
  return balance;
}                   
                      
void Account::operator+=(double num)
{
   double accountbalance;
   accountbalance = getbalance();                        
   accountbalance += num;
   setbalance(accountbalance);

}

void Account::operator-=(double num)
{
   double accountbalance;
   accountbalance = getbalance();                        
   accountbalance -= num;
   setbalance(accountbalance);

}
                                                
// class destructor
Account::~Account()
{
	// insert your code here
}

checking.h

// Class automatically generated by Dev-C++ New Class wizard

#ifndef CHECKING_H
#define CHECKING_H

#include "account.h" // inheriting class's header file

// No description
class Checking : public Account
{
	public:
		// class constructor
		Checking(int, double);
		// class destructor
		~Checking();
};

#endif // CHECKING_H

checking.cpp

// Class automatically generated by Dev-C++ New Class wizard

#include "checking.h" // class's header file

// class constructor
Checking::Checking(int num, double bal): Account(num, bal)
{
	// insert your code here
}

// class destructor
Checking::~Checking()
{
	// insert your code here
}

may be more code than you need to solve problem but i figured id post it all to be safe

In order to be able to print using << with a custom type (class), you need to overload the << operator of the std::ostream class. And since you are using some class inheritance, it is probably advisable to use a virtual print() function for printing the content of your class (the most derived one). You could do the following:

// In the declaration of the Account class:
class Account  {
  //...
  public:
    virtual ~Account(); //never forget to make the base-class destructor virtual.

    virtual void print(std::ostream& out) const;
  //..
};

// Then, in account.cpp:

void Account::print(std::ostream& out) const {
  out << "Account: " << num << " Balance: " << bal << std::endl; //or whatever way you want it to look.
};

// Then, if you want a custom printing for Checking, add in declaration of Checking:

class Checking : public Account {
  //...
  public:
    void print(std::ostream& out) const; //this overrides the base-class implementation.
};

// Then, in checking.cpp:

void Checking::print(std::ostream& out) const {
  out << "Checking "; //add some customization.
  Account::print(out); //call the base-class version of print().
};

//finally, somewhere like in account.h or in main.cpp:
// overload the << operator for a Account object
std::ostream& operator <<(std::ostream& out, const Account& obj) {
  obj.print(out); //call the virtual print function.
};

// And then, in main(), you will need to dereference the pointer before using <<.
int main() {
  //...
  cout << *(checking[0]) << endl; //remember that C++ indices start from 0, not 1.
  cout << *(checking[1]) << endl;
  cout << *(checking[2]) << endl;
  //..
};

I tried to do what you said
keep getting errors in account.h on line 14
variable or field print declared void
print declared as a virtual field
expected ; before ( token

You've posted your main twice, instead of account.h.

oh
here is account.h

#define ACCOUNT_H

// No description
class Account
{
	public:
		// class constructor
		Account(int, double);
		// class destructor
	   ~Account();
		void operator+=(double);
        void operator-=(double);
        
         void setAccountNum(int);
         int getAccountNum();
         void setbalance(double);
         double getbalance();
	private:
            int AccountNum;
            double balance;	
};

#endif // ACCOUNT_H

Following what mike said,

// And then, in main(), you will need to dereference the pointer before using <<.
int main() {
  //...
  cout << *(checking[0]) << endl; //remember that C++ indices start from 0, not 1.
  cout << *(checking[1]) << endl;
  cout << *(checking[2]) << endl;
  //..
};

, you would need to call your getbalance function from *(checking[0]), since it gives you the first object, *(checking[1]) giving you the second object, and so on. Also, you can make your get functions const, since they don't change the state of your object.