This is my custom module:

class Player(object):
    def __init__(self, name, score = 0):
        self.name = name
        self.score = score
        
    def __str__(self):
        rep = self.name + ":\t" + str(self.score)
        return rep
    
    def ask_yes_no(self, question):
        response = None
        while response not in ("y", "n"):
            response = input(question).lower()
        return response
    
    def ask_number(self, question, low, high):
        response = None
        while response not in range (low, high):
            response = int(input(question))
        return response

The program:

import games, random

print "Welcome to the world's simplest game!\n"

again = None
while again != "n":
    players = []
    num = games.ask_number(question = "How many players? (2-5): ", low = 2, high = 5)    
    for i in range(num):
        name = raw_input("Player name: ")
        score = random.randrange(100) +1
        player = games.Player(name, score)
        players.append(player)
    
    print "\nHere are the game results: "
    for player in players:
        print(player)
    
    again = games.ask_yes_no("\nDo you want to play again? (y/n): ")

raw_input("Press enter to exit.")

This is the error I get when I run the program:

AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'ask_number'

Please help me. Thanks!

I'm still an ameture at programming, so could you please be a bit more specific about the solution. I don't quite know what you mean by 'Unindent'. Thanks for helping me! :)

I'm still an ameture at programming, so could you please be a bit more specific about the solution. I don't quite know what you mean by 'Unindent'. Thanks for helping me! :)

I mean remove the definitions from the Player class and write them at the beginning of the line.

Edited 5 Years Ago by Gribouillis: n/a

Comments
Clear and precise aid.

Is that the only way? I'm learning from a book at the moment, and this should be possible.

Gribouillis means that obviously those two functions have no business in being in the class Player.

Interestingly I have exactly same functions in module called games for a Blackjack game from one book, without the class Player.

in range(low, high) is not the world's most efficient way to check value is between two limits, here is my code (looks like my coding style, maybe I coded it quickly myself, anyway...)

try:
    input = raw_input
except:
    pass

def ask_yes_no(prompt='Yes or no (y/n)? '):
    while True:
          answer = input(prompt).lower()
          if answer and answer in 'yn':
             return answer

def ask_number(prompt='Number: ', low = None, high = None):
    while True:
          try:
              answer = int(input(prompt))
              if low and answer < low:
                 raise ValueError('Too low')
              if high and answer >= high:
                 raise ValueError('Too high')
              return answer
          except ValueError as e :
              print(e)
              print('Try again')

Thanks for the help guys.

My book is called "Python Programmin, third edition: For the absolute beginner." maybe you know it from somewhere..

So, I usually write the programs directly from the book, and sometimes there are some errors here and there, I often I can take care of it myself. But stuff like this I can't, because I just plainly don't understand the problem. Thanks for helping my understand!

Do you think you could maybe explain why the two functions shouldn't be in the Player class?

Thanks again!

You use different style with classes, mostly you like to access methods through an instance of class:

test_module.py

import t_class2

t_class2.hello()

p = t_class2.Player()
p.hello()

test_class2.py

class Player(object):
    def hello(self, message='Hello from class Player'):
        print(message)

def hello(message='Hello from module %s' % __file__):
    print(message)

Edited 5 Years Ago by pyTony: n/a

Do you think you could maybe explain why the two functions shouldn't be in the Player class?

It's a matter of class design. Normally, functions in a class Player execute player's action or report about player's state, or they may execute code relative to all players (in this case they are class methods or static methods). Technically, one says that each class has a certain number of "responsibilities". General utility functions like ask_yes_or_no() are unrelated to this class.

If you absolutely want to have this functions in the class, write

@staticmethod
    def ask_yes_or_no(): # no self parameter
      ...

and then use game.Player.ask_yes_or_no()

Edited 5 Years Ago by Gribouillis: n/a

Okay, thanks. This helped me understand.

I'll try to remember this when a similar problem occurs later.

Just curious, for how long have you been programming?

This question has already been answered. Start a new discussion instead.