Hi everyone,
This October I will start university study (Open University in UK). I’m 35 and work full time (non-scientific, non-IT background). I plan to study to become a software developer in Java (that’s the language the Uni uses; they also have one course in VB.net)
I’m not convinced yet that I have what it takes to be a software developer. My main fear is that my logic is not good enough. I’ve tried some online logic problems and I seem to be able to solve some but not others. In most cases after I see the solution I understand how they were supposed to work.
My question is: How can I know my logic skills are good enough for programming? (Is it something you either have or you don’t; or do they come with practice?)
Another question, on a more practical note: Is it true that employers are biased towards employing younger developers (in their 20s and 30s)? (I will be about 40 when/if I graduate:o))
Thanks!

Edited 4 Years Ago by Florinmoc

How can I know my logic skills are good enough for programming?

Can you methodically work toward an understanding of a problem and devise a solution using common sense? If so, your logic skills are good enough.

Is it something you either have or you don’t; or do they come with practice?

It's definitely about practice. Some people have an innate talent for problem solving, but that just gives them a head start. Programming and problem solving are learned skills; you'll get better at them with experience, and no reasonable employer will expect you to be a rock star right out of university.

Is it true that employers are biased towards employing younger developers (in their 20s and 30s)? (I will be about 40 when/if I graduate:o))

Age discrimination is illegal in the UK.

I agree with deceptikon, except that I can confirm from personal experiance that there is a definite age bias towards hiring juniors who will work 20 hour days for coke & pizzas, especially in exciting startup or high-prestige IT companies. However larger more established companies, where the managers are a bit more mature, will value the reliability and stability of people who have grown up.

I agree with both other guys, but remember one thing. Talent is something that helps you progress faster but it doesn't mean that will stop you from being a good programmer. Not everyone can have natural talent of Michael Shumacher, but it doesn't mean rest of us should stop driving cause we don't have his instant reactions.

Practice as other guys mentioned is the key and specially about algorithms, you'll notice after solving few dozens of them, there are hints in every problem that helps you to put it in the right category and as soon as you do that, you can use pre-defined and previously proven methods to solve your problem.

Good luck!

I truly believe that if you are up to it, if you are ok with working tons of hours to catch up, if you will read and code a lot you have a very big chance to get to where you want to get. Sure, if you were younger it would have been easier for you but that doesn't mean it's impossible, it's just harder.

So if you are serious about this then get started right away and don't waste any more time. A minute wasted by you will be equivalent to like 1 hour wasted by a younger person so be sure that young guy wastes more than you.

Edited 4 Years Ago by Mike+9

This article has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.