I am new here and it's my first post, so I'm sorry if this is in the wrong place or is formatted wrong. I made my first Python
code, which is extremely simple, but I have a few questions I need clarified:

This program asks the user to enter 3 integers, and will add them.
num1 = int(raw_input("Enter an integer"))
num2 = int(raw_input("Enter a second integer"))
num3 = int(raw_input("Enter a third integer"))
ans = num1 + num2 + num3
print "The sum of the 3 integers entered is", ans

I'm trying to make sure I fully understand the basics.  Whenever raw_input is used, the program sees the inputted value as a string, so I made sure to convert them to integers.  I understand this much. On the line that says "ans = num1 + num2 + num3", is this "ans" variable considered to be an integer, since the num1, num2, and num3 variables were?
My main question involves the last line.  I know that the part of the line that says "The sum of the 3 integers entered is" is a string.  is the ", ans" part at the end still an integer?  Also, is there another way I could have written this last line, using a plus sign?  I feel like I remember seeing a program where the print statement put the variables in using plus signs or something...
I'm sorry if these are silly questions, but programming does not come naturally to me, so I want to be sure I am thinking about this correctly.  Thank you.

Hi frankie198, welcome to DaniWeb!
There are no silly questions. Only dumb answers; like mine perhaps. :)
As I'm a learner of Python myself, the Python interprter can infer what type is at hand and acts acordingly. So if you print an integer type it will be auto converted to a string. The great Python gurus around here will probably tell you more.

You have convert all input to integers,so answer(ans) is also an integer.
Can look at some improvement.

num1 = int(raw_input("Enter an integer"))
num2 = int(raw_input("Enter a second integer"))
num3 = int(raw_input("Enter a third integer"))
print "The sum of the 3 integers entered is: {}".format(sum((num1, num2, num3)))

So in this version use build in sum() and string formatting.

>>> a = 1, 2, 3
>>> a
(1, 2, 3)
>>> sum(a)
6
>>> print '{} {}'.format('my score is' , sum(a))
my score is 6

If you think of it,it's really the same answer repeating 3 times.

result = []
for times in range(3):
    result.append(int(raw_input("Enter an integer: ")))
print "The sum of the 3 integers entered is: {}".format(sum(result))
commented: Super! +15

You can also use
print(type(ans))

In short:

I'm trying to make sure I fully understand the basics. Whenever raw_input is used, the program sees the inputted value as a string, so I made sure to convert them to integers. I understand this much. On the line that says "ans = num1 + num2 + num3", is this "ans" variable considered to be an integer, since the num1, num2, and num3 variables were?

Correct. ans is an integer!

My main question involves the last line. I know that the part of the line that says "The sum of the 3 integers entered is" is a string. is the ", ans" part at the end still an integer?

ans will always be an integer until it is modified!

Also, is there another way I could have written this last line, using a plus sign? I feel like I remember seeing a program where the print statement put the variables in using plus signs or something...

There are a few ways:
(1) You can just replace ans with (a + b + c). For example:

a = int(raw_input("Enter first integer: "))
b = int(raw_input("Enter second integer: "))
c = int(raw_input("Enter third integer: "))
print "The sum is:", (a + b + c)

(2) You can find the sum, convert it into a string, and append it to what's being printed out. Ie: print "The sum is: " + str(a + b + c).

(3) You can keep it just the way it is. There's no advantage to doing math in the same line you're printing with.

Actually using string formatting would be the most pythonic way:

num1 = int(raw_input("Enter an integer"))
num2 = int(raw_input("Enter a second integer"))
num3 = int(raw_input("Enter a third integer"))
ans = num1 + num2 + num3
print("The sum of the 3 integers entered is {}".format(ans))

You might also like to see this Python 3... example:
(that uses a function to loop until valid integer input)
(and that loops to ask user if more numbers to be input)
(and that demo's the use of a list 'generator')
(and that demo's the use of 'join')

# sumNumbers.py #

def takeInInt( msg ):
    loop = True
    while( loop ):
        try:
            i = int(input(msg))
            loop = False
        except( ValueError ):
            print( "Only integers valid here ... try again ..." )
    return i


nums = []
more = True
while( more ):
    num = takeInInt( "Enter next integer to sum: " )
    nums.append( num )
    more = ( input( "More (y/n) ?" ).upper() != 'N' )

lstNumAsStrsGen = list( str(x) for x in nums )
print( '+'.join(lstNumAsStrsGen), '=', sum(nums) )