According to the [Australian Federal Police](http://www.afp.gov.au/), it would appear that at least half a million credit cards 'down under' have been compromised and funds in excess of AUS $25 million (US $26 million) stolen. Although precise details are still coming in, it would seem likely that nothing more complicated than a bit of simple scanning for point of sale terminals which looked vulnerable was used to locate potential victims in the small retailer market rather than run the greater risk of detection by targeting banks or bigger business. Lessons learned from the Subway caper in the US last year no …

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The UK's National Crime Agency (NCA) has said that it has dealt a "major blow to dark web markets." In a [statement](http://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/news/news-listings/483-international-law-enforcement-deals-major-blow-to-dark-web-markets) issued on the 7th November the NCA says that a coordinated operation between law enforcement agencies in Europe and the US has "targeted market places for illegal commodities on the dark web" and as part of this six people in the UK were arrested. Amongst those arrested in strikes closely coordinated with international partners in the US were the suspected administrators of Silk Road 2.0, the Tor accessed drugs and firearms market place. The NCA statement also claims …

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The news that JPMorgan Chase & Co, which is the largest of the US banks with a reach that extends to half of all American households, has been breached will surprise nobody. At least not in the sense that this is old news, with a disclosure of the event happening in August. The actual breach was discovered by the bank back in July, and is thought to have been active for at least a month prior to that. What is surprising, however, is that a financial organisation of such a size and reputation should fall victim to such a breach …

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According to research from data recovery specialists Kroll Ontrack, some three quarters of those workers that had lost data on a broken device didn't attempt to ensure that information was irretrievable before disposing of the hardware. ![dwebdatarip](/attachments/large/0/dwebdatarip.jpg "dwebdatarip") It doesn't matter whether the hardware itself is a PC or laptop, removable drive, tablet or smartphone, the ugly truth remains that most people simply assume that if the device is dead then the data has died along with it. Actually, data lost through software corruption or hardware failure is more often than not recoverable - at least partially. The study revealed …

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News has broken this weekend that the personal data, including bank account details, of some 2.4 million customers of the Carphone Warehouse may have been compromised following a breach that the mobile phone retail giant is calling "a sophisticated cyber-attack." The company also warns that encrypted credit card data of up to 90,000 customers may have been accessed during the breach. Scotland Yard and the Information Commissioner's Office have both been notified, along with a security outfit specialising in forensic examination of such attacks. However, the statement from Carphone Warehouse, released on Saturday, and revealing that the compromised personal details …

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"Our investigation currently indicates that the attackers accessed Adobe customer IDs and encrypted passwords on our systems. We also believe the attackers removed from our systems certain information relating to 2.9 million Adobe customers, including customer names, encrypted credit or debit card numbers, expiration dates, and other information relating to customer orders. At this time, we do not believe the attackers removed decrypted credit or debit card numbers from our systems." These are the words of Brad Arkin, Chief Security Officer at Adobe as he reveals that one of the biggest names in the software business has fallen victim to …

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According to research commissioned by security vendor [Bit9 + Carbon Black](https://www.bit9.com/solutions/carbon-black/), nearly half (49%) of the organisations questioned admitted they simply didn't know if their businesses had been compromised or not. This uncertainty regarding cyber-attack detection ability comes in stark contrast to the 32% who confirmed they had been attacked during the previous 12 months and the 64% expecting to be targeted in the next 12 months. Looking a little closer at the data, when it comes to who might be attacking them, hacktivists on 86% bizarrely came top of the list ahead of cyber-criminals with 77% and disgruntled employees …

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SuperValu has confirmed that is has, indeed, suffered a data breach. The supermarket company [stated](http://www.supervalu.com/security.html) that what it calls a "criminal intrusion into the portion of its computer network that processes payment card transactions for some of its retail food stores, including some of its associated stand-alone liquor stores" may have resulted in "the theft of account numbers, and in some cases also the expiration date, other numerical information and/or the cardholder’s name, from payment cards used at some point of sale systems at some of the Company’s owned and franchised stores." If you thought that was a bit of …

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As a platform, Android is naturally very attractive to the criminal fraternity in terms of potential profitability. After all, it has the market share and that nearly always means it has large numbers of users for whom the word security may as well be written in the Cyrillic alphabet. My analogy assumes, of course, that those are users not familiar with this particular script and I used it for good reason: new worms coming out of Russia are posing a threat to Android users. Denis Maslennikov, a security analyst with AdaptiveMobile, has discovered a previously unknown worm called [Selfmite](http://www.adaptivemobile.com/blog/selfmite-worm). This …

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It seems like forever, but actually it was only the end of last year that we were [writing about CryptoLocker](http://www.daniweb.com/hardware-and-software/microsoft-windows/viruses-spyware-and-other-nasties/news/470427/cryptolocker-250k-infections-in-100-days-nets-300000-or-does-it) which had pretty much redefined the ransomware landscape. Now this particular threat market is morphing again with the discovery of onion crypto ransomware. Also known as Critroni, and CTB-Locker for what it's worth, the ransomware has been openly available (if you'll excuse the contradiction) on the underweb dark market for a few weeks now. However, this last week it has emerged in the wild being dropped by something called the Angler exploit kit. So why is this such a change …

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The Onion Router, better known as the Tor Network, is often thought of as being the dark-side of the web. Not least as the anonymity provided by Tor meant that sites hosted on so-called hidden service servers were free to trade in just about anything from drugs and guns through to child pornography. In amongst the depravity and illegal excess, of course, were political activists and dissidents looking for an online safe haven in order to escape persecution, prosecution and potentially death. Revelations that the FBI would appear to have been behind the takedown of Freedom Hosting, apparently responsible for …

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As a gamer myself, I thought that last year was a pretty good one. After all, not only did I get to play both GTA V and Call of Duty: Ghosts (indeed, I'm still playing it and working my may through the prestige levels) but if I had enough spare cash and will I could have bought an Xbox One or PlayStation 4. As it happens, I did buy a Lenovo IdeaPad Y510P which can manage a pretty respectable average of 40fps in Crysis on the high quality settings at native resolution. However, according to research figures from Kaspersky Lab, …

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The Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack is becoming the crowbar of the online criminal. In the past we have got rather used to DDoS attacks being one of the favoured approaches of hacktivists, with perhaps the Low Orbit Ion Cannon (LOIC) and later the High Orbit Ion Cannon (HOIC) as used by Anonymous to take down sites being the best known examples. However, recent evidence suggests that taking down a site is increasingly no longer the be all and end all of a DDoS attack, instead it's just a means to a much more profitable end. A couple of …

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According to Dell SecureWorks Counter Threat Unit (CTU) security researcher [Keith Jarvis](http://www.secureworks.com/cyber-threat-intelligence/threats/cryptolocker-ransomware/), the CryptoLocker ransomware that has been written about so much of late has infected as many as 250,000 computers during the first 100 days of distribution (staring on the 5th of September, 2013). What's more, Jarvis estimates, based upon independent research, that owners of at least 0.4% of the infected machines will have paid the ransom demanded in order to unlock their data. Some pretty simple maths says that the $300 ransom multiplied by 1000 users equals a net haul of $300,000. Right? Well, maybe not. Although it …

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US retail giant Target [has confirmed](http://pressroom.target.com/news/target-confirms-unauthorized-access-to-payment-card-data-in-u-s-stores) that hackers gained access to payment card data that could mean 40 million credit and debit card accounts are at risk. An official statement says that the retailer is "aware of unauthorized access to payment card data that may have impacted certain guests making credit and debit card purchases in its U.S. stores" and is now working with law enforcement and financial institutions having "identified and resolved the issue". The accounts in question were targeted, no excuse for the pun, between November 27th and December 15th in order to hit the increasingly busy seasonal …

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Black Friday has historically been a very American phenomenon, marking the start of the seasonal Xmas shopping rush and happening the Friday after Thanksgiving. In the past it has led to scenes of semi-rioting and chaos in some stores as the Walmartarati fight over bargain electrical goods. The UK got a taste of the madness yesterday, with shoppers working themselves into a frenzy at various Walmart-owned ASDA supermarket stores across the country. Some of the most violent scenes were witnessed at the West Belfast, Northern Ireland branch of ASDA where one woman was hospitalized and [reports](http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/asda-stores-witness-black-friday-chaos-as-fights-break-out-over-televisions-8973447.html) of pensioners being pushed …

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According to [BitcoinWatch](http://bitcoinwatch.com/) the current market capitalization of the virtual currency stands at an incredible $10.4 billion. A single Bitcoin is now worth more than $800. In the ongoing aftermath of [the Silk Road takedown](http://www.daniweb.com/hardware-and-software/networking/news/466982/silk-road-2-goes-live-did-the-fbi-arrest-the-wrong-dread-pirate-roberts) many people wrongly assume Bitcoin is some kind of criminal currency, used to trade in anything and everything illegal online. However, be in no doubt that cyber-criminals are, indeed, attracted to Bitcoin: they are targeting it in virtual bank robberies. ![5b4b2c065952977ce6e1c623f7639471](/attachments/small/0/5b4b2c065952977ce6e1c623f7639471.jpg "align-right") Last month reports surfaced of an Australian Bitcoin 'bank' called inputs.io being hacked and the owner relieved of some 4,100 Bitcoins worth $1.3 …

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Did the FBI get the wrong man, or at least the wrong Dread Pirate Roberts (DPR), when it shut down the Silk Road darknet marketplace? Claims are being made that this is precisely what happened, and that Ross Ulbricht who was arrested took over as acting DPR from the real Silk Road founder before the FBI made its move. In a statement, reposted to Pastebin today under the title of '[Possible truths behind DPR and Silk Road](http://pastebin.com/5VkmGi0u)', someone calling themselves Elthemor Sagewood and claiming to be a well known Silk Road vendor says "In a court hearing today, Ulbricht's lawyer …

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Small groups of what are best described as cyber-mercenaries, willing and able to perform surgically precise hit and run hacking operations, are offering their services for hire out of China, Japan and South Korea. That's the conclusion of security researchers at [Kaspersky Lab](http://www.kaspersky.co.uk/) who have been following the progress of a newly discovered espionage campaign, known as Icefog and targeting the supply chain in South Korea and Japan which feeds companies in the West. Icefog is an APT, or Advanced Persistent Threat, and in the words of the Kaspersky Lab [report](http://www.securelist.com/en/blog/208214064/The_Icefog_APT_A_Tale_of_Cloak_and_Three_Daggers) a "small yet energetic" one. Although it appears to …

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Users of online banking services are at risk from a new 'in the wild' Trojan, Hesperbot, which has been discovered by the ESET malware research lab. Researchers have found that infections of users in Turkey are currently most rife, with users in the Czech Republic, Portugal, Thailand and the United Kingdom also falling victim along with smatterings elsewhere. Victims in the Czech Republic, so it would seem, have been hardest in terms of financial loss with ESET claiming that people hit by Hesperbot in this region have "lost significant amounts of money as a result". Hesperbot is spread using very …

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According to the fourth annual [Web Application Attack Report](http://www.imperva.com/download.asp?id=419) from Imperva retailers suffer from twice as many SQL injection attacks when compared to other industry sectors. What's more, the United States remains the number one source of all web attacks. Other key findings of the report include the startling revelation that one website was observed to be under attack for 98% of the time, or 176 out of 180 days if you want to be precise. One web application was seen to receive a mind-boggling 94,057 SQL injection requests in a single day which, if you do the math, works …

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A successful tournament poker player from Japan, with earnings estimated at $1.5 million from his prowess at bluffing and holding his nerve under pressure, has been arrested and charged with being behind an Android malware distribution operation that netted even more: $3.9 million according to Symantec. The Chiba Prefectural Police in Japan arrested a total of nine people in connection with distributing spam emails with download links to the Android.Enesoluty malware. Symantec [reports](http://www.symantec.com/connect/blogs/big-poker-player-loses-high-stakes-android-scam-game) that one of these was 50 year old Masaaki Kagawa, president of an IT firm from Shibuya, Tokyo. "His passion for taking chances and risks has paid …

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New research by [Varonis](http://www.varonis.com/) has revealed that only 25% of those companies questioned were able to answer yes to the question: "Are you able to detect when files containing sensitive data are uploaded to a third party cloud service?" Which left a staggering three-quarters of businesses in the dark about the potential for data leakage. It's a growing problem, what with the increasingly widespread availability of public cloud storage such as [Dropbox](http://www.dropbox.com) and [Google Drive](https://drive.google.com/) to employees during the last couple of years. The research paper 'Security Incidents and Real-time Alert' also suggests that companies are in the dark about …

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Global online cash provider [Ukash](http://www.ukash.com), founded in 2001 and with a presence in more than 50 countries across 6 continents, has warned users not to get scammed by a loan company con doing the rounds at the moment. Ukash works on a code basis, with the user buying a voucher in a shop or petrol station for example, and the unique 19 digit code it contains is used to pay for stuff anywhere online that accepts Ukash transactions (the codes can also load 'cash' into prepaid cards and e-wallets). ![8dacd82b5aee0265e8e9055ff922f33a](/attachments/small/0/8dacd82b5aee0265e8e9055ff922f33a.jpg "align-right") Reports are emerging that conmen claiming to represent 'The …

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Konami, the Japanese games developer responsible for such genre defining classics as Metal Gear Solid and Silent Hill, has confirmed that tens of thousands of customer accounts have been put at risk due to a breach of the Konami ID portal site. During a period between the 13th June and 7th July, hackers made numerous unauthorised logins. Indeed, during this period it has been suggested that as many as 4 million account hacking attempts were executed. Konami warns that a total of 35,252 customer accounts were hijacked with the attackers having access to personal data including dates of birth, telephone …

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The news that, following a number of pretty high-profile password compromise cases, Twitter is adopting a two-factor authentication for account access is to be welcomed. 2FA, as it is known, applies the better security concept of something you know combined with something you own into the access equation. The thing you know is your password, and the thing you own is your mobile phone. Here's how it works, once 2FA has been enabled and you try to log into Twitter from a 'new' device a code will be sent by SMS to the mobile phone which you have registered with …

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All right stop, collaborate, and listen. A new variant of the ZeuS financial malware platform known as Ice. This baby Trojan spawned from the original Ice IX is targeting bank customers on both sides of the pond. Here in the UK the 'big three' telecommunications providers are where it is flowing like a harpoon, daily and nightly. One thing is for sure, this ain't no vanilla ice attack. [ATTACH=RIGHT]23731[/ATTACH]OK, rubbish pop rap references apart, this is actually quite a serious deal. The new Ice TX configurations are apparently not only stealing bank account data, as if that weren't bad enough. …

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A recent survey, conducted by IT risk management specialists nCircle, suggests that as many as 50% of IT security professionals think that the organisations they work for are a potential target for state-sponsored hackers. A number that Tim Keanini, nCircle Chief Research officer, thinks is rather on the low side in reality. "The number of organizations that are potential targets for state-sponsored cyber attacks is probably much higher than 50%, because if attackers can’t break into a targeted organization, they will go after partners and suppliers" Keanini insists, adding "Frankly, I’m surprised that the level of paranoia among information security …

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With Twitter now more than 100 million accounts strong, and with 50 million Tweets per day, you might be excused for thinking there's no stopping the micro-blogging network. Until, that is, you start exploring the darkside of Twitter. But is Twitter evil? [attach]16201[/attach]You only have to look at the IT news headlines over the last year to realise that Twitter has something of a security problem. [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/news/story299145.html"]Hacking the NASA Twitter Account[/URL], [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/news/story290742.html"]Tory Twitter account hacked[/URL], [URL="http://www.itpro.co.uk/blogs/daveyw/2009/12/10/first-tweet-bombing-is-a-twitter-denial-of-service-attack-next/"]First Tweet Bombing, is a Twitter Denial of Service attack next?[/URL] and [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/news/story229498.html"]Twitter gets knickers in a twist over security scare[/URL] being just a small …

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According to security experts at data governance outfit Varonis, 2013 will be the year of the salami attack. On the plus side, they also predict that the world will not come to an end on December 21st 2012. It's not just salami that your business needs to worry about in terms of tech though. Varonis also points towards challenges such as the growing gap between people in a company who know how to find information and those who do not (the importance of intelligent internal search, retention and data archiving), the growing gap between how people use technology at work …

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The End.