Back in the eighties, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency ([DARPA](http://www.darpa.mil/)) spent more than a billion dollars in an attempt to create what was, in effect, Skynet. You know, the self-aware artificial intelligence system that goes bad in The Terminator movie. DARPA called it the Strategic Computing Initiative, but it was Skynet alright. You only have to read this little bit of political persuasion in favour of the idea back then to get that: "...there will be unique new opportunities for military applications of computing. Instead of fielding simple guided missiles or remotely piloted vehicles, we might launch completely autonomous …

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The US military is apparently making good use of a secure Facebook-like system for networking which already has hundreds of user groups and thousands of members. Known as "milBook" the system has been embraced by the Department of Defense for the way it can open up safer avenues of communications amongst personnel. Previously, the department lacked a medium for employees to share official and sometimes sensitive information. MilBook provides several options for users who wish to share information with specific individuals. By creating discussion threads, they can exchange ideas among specific, self-created groups on topics such as Army policies. "The …

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It has been just over a month now since North Korea gloated about its successful nuclear weapon test. A test which prompted the imposition of new UN sanctions against Pyongyang, and if the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) which acts as a state mouthpiece for the Democratic People's Republic of Korea is to be believed, it has also prompted "intensive and persistent" cyber-attacks. Attacks, according to the North Koreans, which have been jointly launched by South Korea and the United States. ![28f2a88054ead0da521c67c6964c43a1](/attachments/small/0/28f2a88054ead0da521c67c6964c43a1.jpg "align-right") The KCNA claims that the attacks, which are believed to have taken down official state websites such …

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[ATTACH=right]16650[/ATTACH]In the wake of the [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/news/story302388.html"]Wikileaks scandal[/URL], the National Guard has announced new "[URL="http://www.ng.mil/news/archives/2010/08/081110-NGB.aspx"]social media guidelines[/URL]" for the nation's citizen soldiers. While a lot of the guidelines are the same sort of common sense, don't-embarrass-your-family's good name restrictions we might place on our teenagers' use of Facebook and MySpace, there's also this passage in the official press release that would seem to be aimed directly at would be WikiLeakers: [QUOTE]Posting internal documents or information that the National Guard has not officially released to the public is prohibited, including memos, e-mails, meeting notes, message traffic, white papers, public affairs guidance, pre-decisional …

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Gary McKinnon, an unassuming 46 year old Londoner who suffers from Asperger's syndrome and depression, is an unlikely man to be making headlines the world over once again. Indeed, across the last decade McKinnon has almost seemed to be a permanent fixture in news media feeds online and off, a thorn in the side of successive British Governments and a man who divides opinion whenever his name is mentioned. Thinking of him as the man who, according to US lawyers, committed "the biggest military computer hack of all time" helps to put the reasons why into perspective. ![dweb-mckinnon](/attachments/small/0/dweb-mckinnon.jpg "align-right") Gary …

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It came as a shock to many people that the “No Russian” mission in [I]Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2[/I] allowed players to act with such extreme malicious intent. The inclusion of the mission sparked a blazing controversy amongst pundits and critics alike, with its gratuitous depiction of terrorists mowing down innocent civilians at a crowded Russian airport. It was one of the most intimately morbid moments in recent gaming history. [ATTACH]17130[/ATTACH]It doesn’t come as any shock that after all the public scrutiny [I]Modern Warfare 2[/I] received, the soon-to-be released [I]Medal of Honor[/I] is being met with resistance before the …

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I need help with converting standard time to military time through a button. Then being able to use another button to convert back.

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[ATTACH=right]16313[/ATTACH]More smartphones could soon be headed to Kandahar, Baghdad or other hotspots where U.S. Troops can use a little technological assistance - not to be able to Tweet or check for the latest news from their brigade on [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/news/story299599.html"]Wikileaks[/URL] - but for communicating with the locals. DARPA - the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency - perhaps best known for creating a little thing called the Internet, has been testing three voice recognition and translation technologies for use by troops in Iraq and Afghanistan as part of the bureaucratically-named project TRANSTAC. Judging by a [URL="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fOIbdB7s0o4&feature=player_embedded"]video from the National Institute for Standards …

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People who are unhappy with the progress of the military actions in Iran and Afghanistan finally have something to blame: PowerPoint. “PowerPoint makes us stupid,” Gen. James N. Mattis of the Marine Corps, the Joint Forces commander, said in an [URL="http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/27/world/27powerpoint.html?emc=eta1"]article [/URL]in the [I]New York Times[/I] this week. The article went on to describe how the software "is deeply embedded in a military culture that has come to rely on PowerPoint’s hierarchical ordering of a confused world." Articles in military journals on the same subject appeared in 2009: [URL="http://smallwarsjournal.com/blog/2009/07/print/draft-draft-draftpowerpoint-1/"]One [/URL]in [I]Small Wars Journal[/I] and [URL="http://www.afji.com/2009/07/4061641"]another [/URL]-- which actually spawned the …

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Call the National Guard. On second thoughts, call someone else. After all, it is the National Guard which has somehow managed to lose an archival data disk containing five years worth of staff records covering some 15,000 personnel. The US National Guard is now recommending that any current and former members of staff who are potentially impacted by the loss contact a credit reference bureau. US social security numbers are highly valued amongst identity thieves as they are a common method of identification in all sorts of transactions. Of course, it isn't the first time that National Guard data has …

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Gary McKinnon is either a UFO-obsessed nerd who happens to suffer from a form of autism, or a fugitive from justice who was responsible for the biggest military hack of all time. The description varies depending upon whether you are a balanced individual with no axe to grind or the US authorities looking for a scapegoat to deflect the simple fact that their own cyber-defences are woefully inadequate. Rather predictably, but nonetheless sadly, Gary McKinnon today lost his judicial review in London which he was hoping would allow him to be tried for his crimes in the UK rather than …

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There has been no shortage of data loss by the military over the last year or so, from [URL="http://www.itwire.com/content/view/22897/53/"]US Army files found on eBay MP3 player[/URL] through to more than [URL="http://www.microsoft.com/uk/publicsector/government/information-governance/secure-data-disposal.aspx"]600 laptops going missing from the UK Ministry of Defence[/URL]. However, usually these losses concern data such as names and addresses, maybe some financial information. Serious enough to bring more than a small amount of blushing to the cheeks of those responsible for securing such information in the first place. Imagine, then, just how embarrassed the Ministry of Defence must be right now after it has emerged that no less …

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Where would we be without the Global Positioning System? Well, without GPS I probably would not be at this hotel nice and early, waiting for a meeting to start. Forget the idiots who end up [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/blogs/entry3301.html"]driving on train tracks or toppling over cliffs[/URL], for some of us SatNav has become not a car gadget but an essential tool for business life. Despite SatNav manufacturers sometimes [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/blogs/entry1276.html"]getting things very wrong indeed[/URL], the honest truth is that without GPS I would, quite frankly, be paddling up a smelly dark brown creek without a canoe. Which is why I was a little worried …

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The iPhone is many different things to many different people. I have heard some refer to it as their cellphone, while others describe it as a smartphone, a pocket computer and even the Jesus Phone. One thing I have not heard people call it is a weapon though. Until now that is. According to a [URL="http://www.newsweek.com/id/194623"]Newsweek report[/URL] the iPhone could be the "future of networked warfare." Although that report actually mentions just the iTouch by name, the software being developed by the US Department of Defense will run perfectly well on an iPhone because the two are, essentially, one and …

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Reports suggest that Google Earth might have put the top secret British nuclear defence headquarters, at the Faslane HM Naval Base Clyde in Scotland, at risk from terrorist attack after the satellite mapping shows clear images of the facility. The images are highly detailed and even show a couple of Vanguard Class submarines docked. Newspaper reports recount how a couple of years back Google was asked to blur British military bases in Iraq as well as certain strategic military installations in the UK on grounds of national security. I am led to believe that updates to Google Earth have meant …

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The Mayor of London, the totally eccentric Boris Johnson, has written a column in a national newspaper in which he champions fellow loon [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/blogs/entry2863.html"]Gary McKinnon[/URL], the [URL="http://www.itwire.com/content/view/20017/53/"]NASA UFO hacker[/URL]. Currently busy fighting extradition to the USA on the grounds that, essentially, to do so would not be fair to someone with his mental health problems. These seem to revolve around two things. Firstly his obsession with proving that aliens exist, and secondly his suffering from Asperger's Syndrome. It is the former, by the way, that qualifies McKinnon as a raving nutjob in my book, not the latter. McKinnon has expressed …

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What better use of an iPod than to save a soldier's life by stopping a bullet? [URL="http://www.flickr.com/photos/tiki/445618364/in/pool-appleusers/"]This photo[/URL] appears to prove it, although the actual story was that the iPod [I]alerted[/I] the soldier to the fact that he had been shot, but it was his armor that actually stopped the bullet. The story goes something like this: Kevin Garrad, a soldier in Iraq, got into a fight with an insurgent when he had been patrolling the streets, and they opened fire and fought. Kevin managed to kill the insurgent, but had no idea that he had been shot. It was …

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The End.