Last year, CryptoLocker ransomware [hit the headlines](http://www.daniweb.com/hardware-and-software/microsoft-windows/viruses-spyware-and-other-nasties/news/470427/cryptolocker-250k-infections-in-100-days-nets-300000-or-does-it) after infecting hundreds of thousands of computers and encrypting the data, and backups of that data to any connected device, with the promise of decryption on payment of a fee. This kind of IT extortion is profitable for the bad guys as it targets the people who are least likely to be in a position to do anything but pay; the people who are most likely to get infected are the same folk who are least likely to have an offsite backup or know how to get help with such a problem. This …

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To all, It seems that i have this virus, but only seems to have affected my desktop. I am not sure how I picked it up. I did download a bunch of Windows Updates, and rebooted my machine on Friday (4/10), and left for the weekend. I know during the weekend there were some networking guys here, but I do not think any of that has to do with any of my problems. I did notice that after the reboot, I kept getting a popup saying you have new files to copy to your DVD or something like that. HELP_RESTORE_FILES.txt …

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It seems like forever, but actually it was only the end of last year that we were [writing about CryptoLocker](http://www.daniweb.com/hardware-and-software/microsoft-windows/viruses-spyware-and-other-nasties/news/470427/cryptolocker-250k-infections-in-100-days-nets-300000-or-does-it) which had pretty much redefined the ransomware landscape. Now this particular threat market is morphing again with the discovery of onion crypto ransomware. Also known as Critroni, and CTB-Locker for what it's worth, the ransomware has been openly available (if you'll excuse the contradiction) on the underweb dark market for a few weeks now. However, this last week it has emerged in the wild being dropped by something called the Angler exploit kit. So why is this such a change …

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According to Dell SecureWorks Counter Threat Unit (CTU) security researcher [Keith Jarvis](http://www.secureworks.com/cyber-threat-intelligence/threats/cryptolocker-ransomware/), the CryptoLocker ransomware that has been written about so much of late has infected as many as 250,000 computers during the first 100 days of distribution (staring on the 5th of September, 2013). What's more, Jarvis estimates, based upon independent research, that owners of at least 0.4% of the infected machines will have paid the ransom demanded in order to unlock their data. Some pretty simple maths says that the $300 ransom multiplied by 1000 users equals a net haul of $300,000. Right? Well, maybe not. Although it …

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At the risk of being somewhat obsessed by hitmen after [one recent news story](http://www.daniweb.com/hardware-and-software/microsoft-windows/viruses-spyware-and-other-nasties/news/441025/dont-be-fooled-by-the-fake-hitman-scam) here at DaniWeb, I'm running another. This time though, it's cybercriminals and hackers who would hold your computer and data to ransom that are the target of a contract killer. The killer in question being the latest version of HitmanPro, and in the cloud 'second opinion' anti-malware file scanner that's been around for many years now. The HitmanPro.Kickstart feature, however, is brand new and really rather clever. ![hitmanpro](/attachments/small/0/hitmanpro.jpg "align-right") What it does is enable users to create a bootable USB flash drive which can then be …

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In today's heightened threat environment, it is a constant battle for IT security departments to stay on top of all possible attacks and vulnerabilities they could encounter. With insider threats on the rise and the continuous danger posed by external hackers, coupled with the alarmingly quick development of stronger and new forms of attack, it has never been more important for organizations to make sure that they have water-tight security systems and policies. Hackers and in particular organized crime groups, are now of the firm realization that rather than just causing disruption, there is a great deal of money to …

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The End.