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Ten? I thought it was only five. May I request the name of whatever source material you found that in?

You are correct, I had to dig pretty deep to find where I made my mistake - it was the discussion of viscid silk used in glue-covered catching spirals which is 10 times stronger than -- well, rather than go into technical details, I will agree that standard spider silk has only 5 times the tensile strength of steel.

I ran across this interesting tidbit:
In their new work, Kaplan and colleagues used genetic engineering to make a cloned spider silk protein that can form films and fibres. By mixing this material with biosilica -- from the proteins of diatoms -- in aqueous solution, the researchers were able to create a new composite nanomaterial with exceptional mechanical properties. The researchers found that the eliptically shaped silica particles attached themselves to the protein fibres, which as a result became "sticky".
Unfortunately, they did not go into too much detail.

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Elephants cannot sneeze.

I will need some sort of proof of this claim - all mammals sneeze.

A quick google (discounting the songs and kid's stories) shows this:
The Lubindas tried everything - beating tins, banging drums, lighting fireworks. Nothing worked.

This is where the charity Africa Now comes in. Farmers are given seeds to grow chilli hedges and are helped to make dung cakes laced with chilli oil, to burn at night! Why? Because chilli makes elephants sneeze! Mrs Lubinda could not believe her eyes. The elephants fled, and their crops were saved. What's more, Africa Now linked the couple to a buyer so they could also sell the chillies for a fair price.

Humans are the only mammal that does not sneeze through its nose.

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General Motors president Alfred P. Sloan introduced the model year concept in the 1920s as a way to market cars.

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Albert Einstein was born into a Jewish family in Ulm, Germany on March 14, 1879. Note that March 14 is somehow connected to 3.14 (pi), so Albert was born on pi-day.

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Time zone differences cost the world economy over 12 billion dollars a year in lost efficiency.

Is there another option?

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To follow up on your nick -- there are only 2 words in Japanese that end in a consonant, one of which is san; almost all other words are composed of consonant-vowel pairs.

Uhh hate to break it to you dude, but

Yen
Ramen
Sumimasen (excuse me)
San

There are actually quite a few.

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Uhh hate to break it to you dude, but

Yen
Ramen
Sumimasen (excuse me)
San

There are actually quite a few.

Yep! I have been digging through some discussions/descriptions of Japanese, trying to separate out kanji, hirigana, and katakana to see where I went wrong. So far it looks like, er, 'n' is the only consonant that Japanese can end in. It looks like hirigana and katakana:
are merely phonetic symbols composed of mostly consonant-vowel pairs, but also characters representing the 5 Japanese vowel sounds and the consonant 'n'. Just like (well not exactly but...) A, B, C, D, they are combined to make words. Unlike kanji, each symbol (character) by itself does not carry any meaning.
and
One character = consonant + vowel. You can't get a consonant on its own.The only exception is the syllablic N. N is the only consonant that can stand alone in Japanese. However, it is held out for a full beat. Depending on the speaker, region, and word, it may sometimes sound like an M sound or an NG sound. (You may run across words like せんぱい Romanized as "sempai", when they are more truthfully represented as "senpai".) Have no doubt, though, it is the syllablic N.
Ouch, I just discovered romanji which seems to use 'h's at the end of words but is discouraged.

Sigh! I don't think I will study Japanese any time soon.

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Time zone differences cost the world economy over 12 billion dollars a year in lost efficiency.

Is there another option?

That is a really interesting statement - where can I find out more about this.
I wonder whose time would be determined to be standard around the world; the rest would be forced to be time shifted away from diurnal living which I am sure would have its own economic consequences.
What was considered the economic baseline? What were the inefficiencies that they took into consideration?

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Just thumbed through the German news. A liter of gasoline is 1.43 Euro and the Euro costs $1.55 -- quick calculation on the back of a napkin -- if I would go to visit some distant relatives in Germany now, it would cost me $8.39 for a gallon of gasoline there. Ouch!

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The largest cucumber ever harvested weighed in at 8.4 kg.

Note:
Sorry, I was wrong with the full moon. The February months of 1866, 1885, 1915, 1934, 1961 did not have a full moon.

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...
Note:
Sorry, I was wrong with the full moon. The February months of 1866, 1885, 1915, 1934, 1961 did not have a full moon.

LOL, this is a well educated audience, you got to do your homework!

One stroke of lightning could give enough electricity for a 100W light bulb to shine 100 years.

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If you were to shrink the earth down to a ball-bearing the size of a basketball then breath on it, the fog on the surface would be the equivalent of the oceans on the earth.

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The largest cucumber ever harvested weighed in at 8.4 kg.

Have you seen the veggies grown in Alaska? This is not trick photography - that is the winner of the junior division - she grew a 76 pound cabbage in 1998. I looked for a bigger cucumber but did not find one. Saveur magazine article

Attachments cabbage2.jpg 23.78 KB
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Pure gold the size of a matchbox, flattened very thin, can cover an entire tennis court.

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In typical office high-rise, the elevators consume nearly half of the electricity used by the total building.

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In 1810 the U.S. Census found that an average American city had a horse for every three citizens, which is the same ratio of people to cars in the 2000 U.S. Census.

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