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Cook your hamburger all the way through.
No runny eggs.
Wash your vegetables.
Peel your fruit.

Soon if you get sick eating something, it will be your fault not the corporation's that introduced the poisons into the food supply.

Does anyone remember when our food supply was safe?

There was going to be a rant here but I think I am giving up, sigh!

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Last Post by GrimJack
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Cook your hamburger all the way through.
No runny eggs.
Wash your vegetables.
Peel your fruit.

In all those cases it's bacteria, poor sanitary practices, not poisons the corporation put in there!

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Does anyone remember when our food supply was safe?

Never was safe. I recall in 1962 when my family was in France, we were told to wash any fruits or vegetables that didn't get peeled in water with bleach. Were the big bad corporations messing with our food then and there?

Perhaps so many have grown up in a pasteurized, sanitized, hermetically sealed lifestyle, our bodies have no resistance to the stuff that's always been around.

Do real farmers ever get sick from all the germs on food?

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When growing up on the farm during 1950's and 60's we had a cow and never had pasterized milk. Mom just ran it through a strainer to get all the dirt out then chilled it. My parents also took milk sames to a local diary to have tested for diseases, none ever found that I know of. As for home-grown vegies -- we had lots of it, and only washed it to get the dirt off.

Germs?? we had lots of those too, working around farm animals we tend to get a lot of germs on our hands, feet, and nearly every other part of our bodies. I can't count the number of times I've stepped in cow and pig shit. And I suspect farmers do the same even today.

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In all those cases it's bacteria, poor sanitary practices, not poisons the corporation put in there!

So bacteria and poor sanitary practices are okqy? "In the context of biology, poisons are substances that can cause damage, illness, or death to organisms, usually by chemical reaction or other activity on the molecular scale, when a sufficient quantity is absorbed by an organism." Cattle do not normally carry the deadly form of E. coli but when they are fattened in feed-lots using grain, their stomachs can not handle the rich grains and the deadly E. coli is produced. All the feed lots would have to do to keep E. coli out of the food supply would be to feed the cattle with grass for 24 hrs. The slaughter process get E. coli from the fecal matter on to the carcass -- and so on. The Dept of Agriculture is supposed to test the beef entering our food supply but they have 'out-sourced' that to the companies to self-test for contaminants.

Produce is supposed to be tested for contaminants before it is introduced into the food supply; the FDA is supposed to test the produce but they have out-sourced it to the companies to self-test.

The most recent example is the peppers that came in from Mexico - that particular company had 14 shipments turned back at the border for salmonella contamination. That company should have been banned from ever shipping produce into the US until it was inspected by FDA inspectors.

Google "contaminated beef' 'contaminated produce' if you want to know more.

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Never was safe. I recall in 1962 when my family was in France, we were told to wash any fruits or vegetables that didn't get peeled in water with bleach. Were the big bad corporations messing with our food then and there?

Perhaps so many have grown up in a pasteurized, sanitized, hermetically sealed lifestyle, our bodies have no resistance to the stuff that's always been around.

Do real farmers ever get sick from all the germs on food?

You were in France, I am talking about the US. Who told you to wash any fruits or vegetables? Were there any stories of hundreds of people getting sick and many people dying? That was 45 years ago and that is the only counter example you can come up with? My DW and I used to run down to Mexico all the time and eat tacos and stuff from those guys on the corner with grills (we never drank the water - DW wasn't paying attention and washed the grapes in the sink and she was sick for a week, sigh). Farmers generally eat their own food products - not the products of corporate America.

Our bodies do not develop resistance to salmonella or E. coli - you might be able to immunize yourself to these bugs but more than likely the attempt would kill you.

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When growing up on the farm during 1950's and 60's we had a cow and never had pasterized milk. Mom just ran it through a strainer to get all the dirt out then chilled it. My parents also took milk sames to a local diary to have tested for diseases, none ever found that I know of. As for home-grown vegies -- we had lots of it, and only washed it to get the dirt off.

Germs?? we had lots of those too, working around farm animals we tend to get a lot of germs on our hands, feet, and nearly every other part of our bodies. I can't count the number of times I've stepped in cow and pig shit. And I suspect farmers do the same even today.

But the germs you had were not salmonella nor E. coli. I grew up in Montana and fully understand the importance of eating locally. i also think that more kids should be allowed to eat dirt, poke dead animals, disturb ant's nests, and so on but find there is a difference between local germs and corporate germs (heh,heh)

There is an interesting theory about farm animals and European dominance but rather than go through all that - take a look at an earlier post - sort of in the middle of the paragraph.

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