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What ink is used to print dollar ? I guess ink is pretty costly , have you got an idea how many $100 bills can be printed using a set of ink cartridge ?

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The real cost of printing too much money to pay for wars and failed banks will be hyperinflation down the road. Just ask folks from countries like Argentina or Zimbabwe.

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I put off looking at this because I did not think there would be much of interest for me - I guess I am more easily amused than I used to be. Vmanes is probably correct the cost is about $.05 - not much relative to the value of a $100 bill but a significant fraction of a $1 bill - we should actually stop producing dollar bills and use dollar coins. The bill only lasts about 19 months and then has to be destroyed - much of wear and tear is probably in vending machines and this is where a coin would shine. Coins cost way more to make but they do not die natural deaths - they do not wear out.

The largest US bill every printed was the $100,000 bill and was only used by banks (even JP Morgan could not get his hands on one), the other 'big' bills were 500, 1,000, 5,000, and 10,000 (my dad was a banker and when his bank had its 50th anniversary, they had a $10,000 bill to display - my dad let me hold it!!!!!!). They stopped producing the above bills in 1946 and then took them out of service in 1969 because it was then possible to transfer money between banks electronically - most people do not have a use for bills larger than a $50.

The $100,000 bill was a gold certificate.

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>>most people do not have a use for bills larger than a $50.
$100 bills are common at the Wal-Mart store I work in. I've not seen a bill larger than that.

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>>most people do not have a use for bills larger than a $50.
$100 bills are common at the Wal-Mart store I work in. I've not seen a bill larger than that.

I should have mentioned that was a personal comment - not official.

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the paper is what is expensive.

Its interweaved with all sorts of stuff. And its got high grade cotton in it. And its made so it is very reeilliant and water resistant.

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Once hyperinflation sets in, I would rather show up at the store with a sack of dollar bills than dollar coins.

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about 2 years ago in india the lowest value coins were actually worth more as metal than as money so people illegally melted down a large % of this currency in circulation for razor blades lol.

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Once hyperinflation sets in, I would rather show up at the store with a sack of dollar bills than dollar coins.

people will show up with either credit or debit cards instead of money. Its almost that way now -- probably 3/4 my sales are with credit/debit cards. When I was first married in 1962 a pickup full of groceries would cost about $65.00 USD. Today I can't get just one sack full for that.

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about 2 years ago in india the lowest value coins were actually worth more as metal than as money so people illegally melted down a large % of this currency in circulation for razor blades lol.

Lolol! Like in Pre-WWII Germany when the hyperinflation got so bad that they burnt the currency too use as fuel in stoves rather than buy coal!

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people will show up with either credit or debit cards instead of money. Its almost that way now -- probably 3/4 my sales are with credit/debit cards. When I was first married in 1962 a pickup full of groceries would cost about $65.00 USD. Today I can't get just one sack full for that.

Think about it. When you have 'hyperinflation', credit cards will melt away quickly, since the money at the beginning of the month is only worth half at the end of the month, nobody will issue credit!

I understand that in some African country, inflation was so bad that the government would issue special stamps to the local banks. The banks would take a bank note, lets say a 50 Dollar bill of their currency, and stamp the new value of 50 million Dollars right on it. Makes your head spin.

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Think about it. When you have 'hyperinflation', credit cards will melt away quickly, since the money at the beginning of the month is only worth half at the end of the month, nobody will issue credit!

I understand that in some African country, inflation was so bad that the government would issue special stamps to the local banks. The banks would take a bank note, lets say a 50 Dollar bill of their currency, and stamp the new value of 50 million Dollars right on it. Makes your head spin.

Sounds like an inflationary idea! Soon everyone had the stamp so no one was broke.

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If you really believe that the US is heading towards hyperinflation then you should try to understand what it is and how to get it.

1. The general population prefers to keep its wealth in non-monetary assets or in a relatively stable foreign currency. Amounts of local currency held are immediately invested to maintain purchasing power.
2. The general population regards monetary amounts not in terms of the local currency but in terms of a relatively stable foreign currency. Prices may be quoted in that foreign currency.
3. Sales and purchases on credit take place at prices that compensate for the expected loss of purchasing power during the credit period, even if the period is short.
4. Interest rates, wages and prices are linked to a price index and the cumulative inflation rate over three years approaches, or exceeds, 100%.

How many of these factors do you see?
There are (at least) 2 models of hyperinflation:

The confidence model - some event or series of events cause doubt that the government issuing the currency will remain solvent;
the monetary model - a positive feedback cycle of increasing the money supply and businesses marking up prices to factor in expected decay of currency's value.

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Inflation happens! Why do you think Judas was paid in silver? (hint - 75 years earlier a king from Timbuktu came through on tour and gave away so much gold that everyone had gold so gold had no value). Many years later, Spain stole so much gold from the new world that, again, gold lost its value and England ruled with its silver standard.
<digression> 2 bits, 4 bits, 6 bits, a dollar - Spain had a coin that could make change - it was minted in such a way that it could be broken into 'pieces of eight'</digression>

If you look at your coins, you will see that they all have a raised edge and some have both raised edges and slots (like the American quarter <2-bits>) - this was how Newton (yeah, the scientist who 'discovered' gravity) was able to protect British coinage from 'shavers'. Prior to this, everyone who got a coin, shaved just a little from the coin and soon no one knew how much each coins was worth.

but I digress

Inflation happens when 'money' is inserted into the economy without concomitant 'work'

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