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If a finite amount of space is absolutely empty , what all law (e.g. newton , quantum theory , string theory) breaks down for that "absolutely empty" piece of space ?

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Last Post by vegaseat
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There is no such thing as space that is absolutely empty. space by definition contains something. And in a vacuum there is no space.

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The only perfectly empty space I know of, is in the cranium of certain politicians. Yes, in that space many scientific laws malfunction.

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The only perfectly empty space I know of, is in the cranium of certain politicians. Yes, in that space many scientific laws malfunction.

Is every thing political for you? Is it all an excuse to insult?

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The only perfectly empty space I know of, is in the cranium of certain politicians. Yes, in that space many scientific laws malfunction.

I was going to say something along that line of thought - I like yours. 'Nuff said!

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I heard there is empty space inside nucleus
of atoms , I guess there will many such example of empty spaces.

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Empty space inside nucleus - hmm, interesting concept! This would be where 'weak' nuclear forces operate; where the location of any of the wavicles is undefined? If the probability exists that any particular location 'within' the nucleus contains the nucleus, can it really be said to be empty? Can it be said to be full? Probably, yes (pun intended).

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I heard there is empty space inside nucleus
of atoms , I guess there will many such example of empty spaces.

What keeps this space from collapsing? There must be something there!

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Makes you wonder if a 'black hole' would have any empty space left. I normally associate a 'hole' with empty space, so a 'black hole' would be better named 'black mass' or a 'black lump'.

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what would be the boiling point of a cup of water in empty space?

A cup of water in empty space wouldn't be an empty space? At least not very long, with all those water molecules floating about from the quickly evaporating water.

As to the boiling point, let's assume 0 K or − 273.15°C.

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