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I stand corrected...since 1865, that's still 142 years of being called a civil war in history books.

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Um, that link pulls up a Daniweb 404 page with a google search at the bottom. Are we supposed to search Daniweb ourselves?

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Please ladies and gentlemen, when Americans refer to a statement as "baloney" and usually from the context it is meant as false. Where or what is the root of this word. It sounds more like food to me!;)

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Please ladies and gentlemen, when Americans refer to a statement as "baloney" and usually from the context it is meant as false. Where or what is the root of this word. It sounds more like food to me!;)

"It is pretty well established that "baloney," meaning nonsense, does come from "baloney" the sausage (which is indeed named after Bologna, Italy). Baloney was (and often still is) regarded as a humble food of, as you say, dubious origins. It thus made a good metaphor for "junk" much as today we use "spam" (fairly or not) to mean unwanted e-mail advertisements. One of the earliest uses of "baloney" to mean nonsense was in the catch phrase "It's baloney no matter how thin you slice it," popular in the 1930's".

http://www.wordwizard.com/ch_forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=1619

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"It is pretty well established that "baloney," meaning nonsense, does come from "baloney" the sausage (which is indeed named after Bologna, Italy). Baloney was (and often still is) regarded as a humble food of, as you say, dubious origins. It thus made a good metaphor for "junk" much as today we use "spam" (fairly or not) to mean unwanted e-mail advertisements. One of the earliest uses of "baloney" to mean nonsense was in the catch phrase "It's baloney no matter how thin you slice it," popular in the 1930's".

http://www.wordwizard.com/ch_forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=1619

that's interesting. Americans really have a way with words.
Sometimes watching "western" movies and even in contemporary society you hear people exclaim "Son of a gun!" what does this mean.

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Not exactly. From what I've heard (I make no claims to the accuracy of this), the phrase originated during the days of sailing. A woman of, er, 'loose morals', shall we say, who found herself pregnant,
would supposedly, if the voyage lasted long enough, give birth behind the cannon. And, since the parentage of such a child would be in doubt, the kid was supposedly listed as the 'son of a gun', for the place of birth. So it's not exactly Josh's claim, but more along the lines of 'b****rd' instead.

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