The assumption is, that the typical workweek starts with Monday and ends with Friday. This is something the average working bloke has to live with (unless you work for a bank or the government). This little code will spit out a listing of all the workdays of a given month. It does not consider special holidays during the week. Anyway, the module calendar that comes with Python does a swell job.

# print out all the workdays (Mon - Fri) of a month
# tested with Python24    vegaseat     01feb2007

import calendar

# change these values to your needs ...
year = 2007
month = 2     # jan=1

# makes Monday first day of week (this is the default)
calendar.setfirstweekday(calendar.MONDAY)

months = ['January', 'February', 'March', 'April', 'May', 'June', 'July',
          'August', 'September', 'October', 'November', 'December']
days2 = ['Mo', 'Tu', 'We', 'Th', 'Fr', 'Sa', 'Su']

print "All the workdays in %s %d:" % (months[month-1] , year)
k = 0
for day in range(1, 32):
    try:
        weekday = calendar.weekday(year, month, day)
    except ValueError:
        continue
    if weekday < calendar.SATURDAY:
        k += 1
        # format the result
        print "%2d) %s  %02d/%02d/%d" % (k, days2[weekday], month, day, year)

"""
my output -->
All the workdays in February 2007:
 1) Th  02/01/2007
 2) Fr  02/02/2007
 3) Mo  02/05/2007
 4) Tu  02/06/2007
 5) We  02/07/2007
 6) Th  02/08/2007
 7) Fr  02/09/2007
 8) Mo  02/12/2007
 9) Tu  02/13/2007
10) We  02/14/2007
11) Th  02/15/2007
12) Fr  02/16/2007
13) Mo  02/19/2007
14) Tu  02/20/2007
15) We  02/21/2007
16) Th  02/22/2007
17) Fr  02/23/2007
18) Mo  02/26/2007
19) Tu  02/27/2007
20) We  02/28/2007
"""
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