I've been learning the .NET framework in vC++ for a while and I'm thinking of going to C#.
I'd like to here the opinions of others who have experience with both.

Thanks.

For Windows forms and Office integration, C# is a lot easier to develop in.

But of course, that's just my opinion.

Andy

Thanks for your reply, I have since tried both and I agree with your opinion, for most of the things I do C# is easier and just as 'powerful'.

C# is also supported by more things. Such as language specific tasks, and ASP.NET. Where as C++.NET isn't.
Not to mention the easy at which you can develope with C#.

I got a c# book called c# in easy steps for under £20 its Really noob though except at the end it does ADO and GDI graphics

C# is also supported by more things. Such as language specific tasks, and ASP.NET. Where as C++.NET isn't.
Not to mention the easy at which you can develope with C#.

But the power of VC++ is still unbeatable by C#. Am I correct? Since VC++ is unmanaged whereas C# is managed. VB and VC# programs run in the same style. VC++ is twice faster in accessing memory objects, arithmetic operations and database access.

But, I didn't tried with unsafe code in C#. Some of my friends are telling that unsafe code in C# will do better (but do it with careful).

Ganesh

for some performance issues VC++ is greater and Network applications also VC++ is better, I worked in network application for small period by VC++, C# and Java
really really VC++ was veryyyyyyyy good and then comes C# then JAVA :S (As I hate it:D)
C# for ADO application is better. as well as your preferred language for web development if you came from C++ world.
Look, you should make use of IDE, if you have big project use the appropriate language in appropriate module.

I think one should be very careful when comparing pure c++ and c++.net. The two are very different beasts.

If you must use dotnet use c# or vb.net.

When it comes to getting the job done, whichever you are more familiar with. If I'm paying someone by the hour, I'd be hard pressed to tell them which .NET language to use if they're already familiar with one over the other. Sure, learning new languages is a good thing, but makes for a bad business model.

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