hello there!
im creating a program with both stdio.h and iostream.h in the include header.
Can the program run with them both? or others?

If you are uisng VC++ 2005 or 2008 then you can't use iostream.h at all. That file is obsolete and has been replace with <iostream>

And yes, you can have stdio.h and <iostream> both in the same program.

for the predefined streams, it's safe to mix C stdio and C++ iostreams. you can safely use stdin and std::cin in the same program; the C++ Standard guarantees that it will work the way you would expect it to.

if you don't need to mix C stdio and C++ iostreams on the same stream, you can get better performance by turning this feature off std::ios_base::sync_with_stdio(false); however, if you need to open a file with C++ iostreams, and at the same time access that file as a C FILE*, there's nothing in the C++ standard to support that usage by default. however, the library is extensible, and a std::streambuf derived class that supports this is just a couple of dozen lines of code.

Comments
Nice answer.

i always start with stdio.h in my programs (im a newbie),
but now im trying to explore other header files like
iostream.h and im starting there...:)

i always start with stdio.h in my programs (im a newbie),
but now im trying to explore other header files like
iostream.h and im starting there...:)

Forget iostream.h -- use <iostream> (without the .h extension)

hello there!
im creating a program with both stdio.h and iostream.h in the include header.
Can the program run with them both? or others?

As Ancient Dragon mentioned: change <iostream.h> to <iostream>. If this doesn't work on your compiler (probably Turbo...), you need to update your compiler to a modern one. Visual Studio (c++) 2008 free for example.

Here's a nice thread with some explanation about headers and also a list of which header are c/c++ standard and what they do.

This article has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.