What is the point of using set and get in C Sharp?

It seems variables are used differently in this language than in C++.

For some reason, you have to have a static variable defined like this:

public static uint Somenum
{
set { m_somenum = value; }
get { return m_somenum; }
}

and prior to this declaration, you need to have this:

public uint m_sumenum;

This seems to be the only way to expose a member of a class to other classes in C#.

The problem is that I seem to be doing this improperly because I get a compile error:

An object reference is required for the non-static field, metod, or property '.......m_somenum"

I think I see the problem. The problem is that I cannot use a static varable like this.

So you have to instantiate the class in order to set these members of the class.

So how would you do the equivalent of a global class in C Sharp?

Would I do it something like this:

public clase SomeClass
{
SomeClass someclass = new SomeClass();


public static uint Somenum
{
set { m_somenum = value; }
get { return m_somenum; }
}
}

Or perhaps this "new" needs to be outside of the class in order to work. So my next question is this. How and where would that command be such that it the internal set methods could be accessed by the other classes in the code?

Edited 3 Years Ago by happygeek: fixed formatting

OK..

public uint m_sumenum;
public static uint Somenum
{
set { m_somenum = value; }
get { return m_somenum; }
}

Not really - firstly it would only be static if the variable was static - eg it was going to be on a per class basis, not a perinstance, that and you dont *HAVE* to use get and set properties to access it, you could just make it public so you would either have a

public class SomeClass
{
public static int ACounter;
public int OtherCounter;
}

In this instance you could make 5 copies of "SomeClass" and 1 counter is shared between them all (ACounter) and 1 counter is per instance (OtherCounter)

so, you dont *need* to but its good practice on the simple grounds that it saves changing it later, and protects your variables if you wish from change.. and you can add validation etc..

In short your initial code with a static property for a instance based private variable fails, because the private variable isnt instanced so the static class cant use it.

public class SomeClass
{
static uint m_somenum;

public static uint SomeNum
{
get { return m_somenum; }
set { m_somenum=value; }
}
}

with this you can write something like this :

SomeClass.SomeNum=otherNumber;

but be warned that this is a static property ! so for each instance of he SomeClass the SomeNum will have the same value.


by the way i really did not understand your question but i think this is what you had in mind.

Guys, please read both the announcements at the top of the forum and get to grips with code tags.

Phew! You are mixing a few things here.
You can have :

public class SomeClass
{
    public int MyInt;
}

In your main method you can now say :

SomeClass MyClass = new SomeClass(); //instantiation
Now use(example) MyClass.MyInt = 42;

You can also have :

public static class SomeClass2
{
    public static int MyInt2;
}

No instantion needed this time, you can directly use
SomeClass2.MyInt2=43;

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