Hello,
At this times i need to decide something that will chage my life forever, it is: Continue with C++ and the possibility to compile my programs at my HP Jornada 720(Handheld PC) and in my PC only and NOT for my j720, or learn C and start my mobile development carrer with eVC++(One of my dreams). What i choose?

Thanks,
Nathan Paulino Campos

Edited 7 Years Ago by Nathan Campos: ...

Because i hate .Net and C#, in my opinion!
And C is much more like C++, than if i go to develop on it will be more easy to learn!

Thanks!

> Please, i need to decide this today, and in only 2 hours!!!
You've been on the forum for a couple of months, and NOW you decide to bounce this on us with only 3 hours to go - sheesh.

I guess planning ahead isn't your forte.

Write each choice on a piece of paper, put them in a bag, shake and draw one out - there, decision made, live with it.

Planing ahead is my forte, but first i have to try both and i do this at this time!

Edited 7 Years Ago by Nathan Campos: spelling

> HP Jornada 720(Handheld PC)
It'll be obsolete before you know what's happened.

Knowing a language in itself is what is portable.

Knowing how to apply that to each platform is a separate step - you seem to be confusing one with the other.

Today its a "HP Jornada 720(Handheld PC)", tomorrow is a "supertron bit master" and the day after it's an "omniplex code crusher".

In my opinion C# is a C++, but like Java and .Net because you can only develop using it are all shareware.

Thanks!

eVC++ isn't really all that much different than VC++ 2008 Express. c++ is c++ is c++. Once you learn c++ on desktop its pretty easy to develop with eVC++. There are some things that eVC++ does not support (at least prior to version 4.0) -- some of them are:

  • No console programs -- everything is GUI based
  • No fstreams, ifstream or ofstream
  • STL is not supported
  • No concept of change directory.
  • MFC is stripped down.
  • No exception handling (e.g. try/catch)

Edited 7 Years Ago by Ancient Dragon: n/a

In my opinion C# is a C++, but like Java and .Net because you can only develop using it are all shareware.

Thanks!

unfortunately there is no free edition of visual studio to develop .net mobile applications. but eVC++ is also not free and i think it is outdated already. i dont know if you are good enough to develop some useful mobile applications using win32 and c++.

but eVC++ is also not free

Yes it is free.

and i think it is outdated already.

No it isn't. Depends on the operating system that's running on the mobile device. eVC++ 4.0 uses PocketPC, while VC++ 2005/8 uses Mobile 5.0 or 6.0 In addition to these compilers you have to have an SDK that is supplied by the manufacturer of the mobile device.

Edited 7 Years Ago by Ancient Dragon: n/a

Yes it is free.


No it isn't. Depends on the operating system that's running on the mobile device. eVC++ 4.0 uses PocketPC, while VC++ 2005/8 uses Mobile 5.0 or 6.0 In addition to these compilers you have to have an SDK that is supplied by the manufacturer of the mobile device.

Give me the free download link please.

Give me the free download link please.

I already did -- just click the link I posted. Click on "yes it is free"

Edited 7 Years Ago by Ancient Dragon: n/a

I've been using first eVC++ 3 and now eVC++ 4 for about 10 years. They're certainly absolutely free.

There is very, very little difference coding for Win CE and coding Win32. As others have said very well, its good to have a good grasp of C & C++. Then you can code for anything.

Geez! I think the Sdks you have to download and install for each seperate piece of hardware are probably free too. At least for the devices I code for you can download the Sdks from their web site. However, if you want a real unit to test it on you'll need to beg, borrow, steal, or buy one!

Here about a month ago I had to finally break down and fork over $550 bucks for VS 2008 Pro. The units I'll be coding for in the future run Windows Moblie and apparently the free eMbedded VC++ 4.0 won't handle that.

I'll tell you what my issues are with this stuff. I really bust my butt trying to code excellent applications for the handheld data collection instruments we use for mission critical information in my organization, and the life expectancy of any particular piece of hardware, that is, not how long it will last but how long the manufacturer will continue to produce and support it, is really, really small. So what that means is that you need to be constantly ready to port your code to completely different hardware. Therein is the problem my friends.

I have a really fundamental problem with this, and I need to figure out some way of handling it. All my application development is excrutiatingly slow and painstaking. I'm a pure Sdk coder. I'm actually considering something I would have never considered several years ago, and that is using a garbage development process to produce garbage software fast. Real fast. To me that translates to some flavor of .NET. The devil incarnate. God help me! I don't know what I'm going to do! But I've got to decide 6 minutes and 47 seconds from NOW!

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