Win32++ is a small C++ library used to build windows applications. It has been designed to be easy to use, and simple to understand. It is an ideal starting point for anyone learning to program for windows using C++. Win32++ also has the added advantage of running on a wide range of free compilers, including Visual Studio Express and Dev-C++.

Here

Anyone using this?
Any comment recommendation
Just curious as I found it via wikipedia ;)

Oh and this here

Windows Template Library (WTL) is a C++ library for developing Windows applications and UI components. It extends ATL (Active Template Library) and provides a set of classes for controls, dialogs, frame windows, GDI objects, and more.

http://wtl.sourceforge.net/

How do they compare with wxWidgets/QT/GTKmm

So Win32++ seems like a simplified version of MFC.

Could do with better documentation (one thing MFC has over it)

I'll tell you my opinion with the stress on OPINION. There is no easy way out. That's what everyone is looking for.

MFC will make it easier (3 months later). UMMM. This is getting confusing. UMMM. Maybe .NET will make it easier (6 months later and still 4 gigabytes of help docs to get through). UMMM. This is pretty confusing...

SomeObj.YetAnotherObj.ThenThisObj.ButDon'tForGetThisObj.ContainedInThisWorkSpace.AndNowAConrtainer....

But I'm willing to try anything but the basic Windows Api. Maybe Win32++...

Somebody please explain to me exactly how you can take a complex multitasking, multithreaded, multiwindowing system such as Windows, then overlay on top of that a complex object oriented layer as only C++ is capable of providing with its abstract base classes, inheritance chains, so on and so forth, and end up with something a beginner is supposed to understand. And the beginners are being told these other routes are easier than learning the basic Windows Api. That's the part that gets me.

the fact that I have to deal with C code to get win32API work turns me off.
Also bad long names just discuorages. C/C++ is really hard beast to tame ):

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