Hello everybody, I just started learning C and decided to join this site. But as soon as I posted some of my code snippets here, immediately I got a stream of insults (thanks to conio.h ). But it's not my fault, I've grown on clrscr() and getch() (due to my experience with C++).

I'm looking for a solution here. Can anyone give me a link to such a compiler which does not support conio.h . I've read the thread "Starting C" and downloaded DEV C++ but it also supported conio.h and hence I wasted my precious MBs. It should be light weight and not be resource hungry.

Second is, I want a good book(pdf would be nice) about C DATA STRUCTURES. Even a site will do.

That post has become to big ;)
I wish you could have give me a more precise link
Ah well ...

>But as soon as I posted some of my code snippets
>here, immediately I got a stream of insults

If you're insulted by people correcting your mistakes, you need to adjust your attitude. Why? Because unless you're some kind of C demigod, you're going to make mistakes and people will correct them. Especially here, since Daniweb has a few members who know a lot about C.

>But it's not my fault, I've grown on clrscr() and getch() (due to my experience with C++).
clrscr and getch are just as non-portable in C++.

>Can anyone give me a link to such a compiler which does not support conio.h
Why not just avoid using conio.h? Every compiler has non-portable extensions and libraries. The best way to write portable code is to understand where the line between standard and non-standard is. There's not a perfect tool for doing that, you'll have to actually use your brain.

>Second is, I want a good book(pdf would be nice)
>about C DATA STRUCTURES. Even a site will do.

I'm partial to this one, for obvious reasons. Unfortunately, I can't recommend just one book on data structures because there are advantages and disadvantages to each one. I might be able to offer a recommendation or two if you specified which data structures interested you.

Personally, I think starting at DADS and using google for the interesting stuff will get you further than any book.

If you're insulted by people correcting your mistakes, you need to adjust your attitude. Why? Because unless you're some kind of C demigod, you're going to make mistakes and people will correct them

With all due respect, in my locality, nobody gives a damn about using conio.h . It's only here that I learned the problems associated with conio.h . So all that I'm asking is for a little patience. Compared to everyone else here, I'm just a hatchling

clrscr and getch are just as non-portable in C++

Then I think it maybe due to the fact that our teachers gave Turbo C++ from the beginning

I'll be learning as I go

By the way, that link didn't have anything about stacks, queues, circular queues, dequeues, priority queues.
I should have mentioned it though, my bad but my priority is with the above mentioned list

>With all due respect, in my locality, nobody gives a damn about using conio.h.
>So all that I'm asking is for a little patience.

With all due respect, I don't care. If you try to teach or encourage poor programming practices, you're going to get called on it. We're not here to make you feel good about yourself, we're here to provide high quality help.

>Then I think it maybe due to the fact that our teachers gave Turbo C++ from the beginning
I think it's due to the fact that your teachers didn't know (or didn't care) about the difference between "it works on this version of my compiler" and "it works everywhere". Turbo C++ supports standard C89, so it's not like you can't write portable code with it.

>By the way, that link didn't have anything about stacks,
>queues, circular queues, dequeues, priority queues.

Well, you didn't mention any specific data structures, did you? Anyway, I prefer not to write a tutorial unless I feel I can add something of value. Stacks and queues are pretty simple and information on them is easy to find with a search engine. Deques and priority queues can get interesting, and they're on my list (but not at the top, and I'm currently very busy). I may fill out the list with simpler data structures just to be thorough though.

>I should have mentioned it though, my bad but
>my priority is with the above mentioned list

As I said, start with DADS and google will take you through all of the basics. The implementation of efficient deques and priority queues can get interesting, but you probably won't get into that for a while.

Edited 6 Years Ago by Narue: n/a

but you probably won't get into that for a while

Actually I will be getting into it 'coz my next semester in college will be totally about data structures. So i was thinking if i could finish the syllabus before the holidays ...
Thanks for DADS

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