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Can someone explain to me why this shows up as

Foothill (user input) : -9.222255e+061
----------------------------------------------------
DeAnza (user input) : -9.222255e+061
----------------------------------------------------
SJSU (user input) : -9.222255e+061
----------------------------------------------------
: 10
----------------------------------------------------
: 20 //my input
----------------------------------------------------
: 30
----------------------------------------------------

void VectorList::DailyReport()
{

	

	cout << "==========NGS Daily Temperature Report==========" << endl;
	cout << "================================================" << endl;
	cout << "------------------------------------------------" << endl;
	for(int K=0, size=List.size() ; K<List.size(); K++) {
		cout << List[K].GetDesignation() << "  : " << List[K].GetTemperature() <<  endl;
		cout << "------------------------------------------------" << endl;
	}
}
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Last Post by stephen.id
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That usually means that your variable contains junk and you haven't
initialized it to anything. I am guessing its a double variable somewhere in
your program.

9.222255e+061

Approximately it also means -9.2 * 10^61

Edited by firstPerson: n/a

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if your variable is in a class then you should have your class constructor and deconstructor for initializing the variable and deinitiliazing the variable

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if your variable is in a class then you should have your class constructor and deconstructor for initializing the variable and deinitiliazing the variable

no such thing as deconstructor and deinitiailazing, in fact that's not even a word. I assume you mean destructor.

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yes thats what i meant sorry my mistake wasnt payin attention that well :)

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