Hi, I am new to C# .net. I recently learned how to connect C# with database (SQL). I know a bit of coding and form designing.
Please suggest me some projects (related to windows application) to work on for practice.

Thanks in advance.

Edited 6 Years Ago by Dany_08: n/a

Make a database of your friends. Store info like address, phone, picture and whatever you want. Make an input-output form as front end, include printing and whatever you see fit. That could keep you buzy for months, while learning alot.

Make a database of your friends. Store info like address, phone, picture and whatever you want. Make an input-output form as front end, include printing and whatever you see fit. That could keep you buzy for months, while learning alot.

Great suggestion! Simple interfaces, simple IO, not much calculations involved, almost infinite enhancements, possible commercial value.
Here's a tougher one. Solve a puzzle:
x x x x x x x
x35x31x33x
x x x x x x x
x30x37x29x
x x x x x x x
x34x31x27x
x x x x x x x
Sorry, don't know the author. This is a 7X7 array where you solve "x". "x" is 1 to 7, the "x" values surrounding the numbers need to add up to the number. No 1-7 number is repeated in any column or row.
This is so tough, I don't think you can solve it without hints. (I needed some. Not for the solution, for the win interface.) A classmate calculated it would take 6 months to solve the puzzle on 0.5 GFLOP machines. Using the worst possible method I could think of, on a 2GFLOP machine, it would take 213 thousand years just to set the numbers. (Set each of the "x"'s from 1 to 7 and then immediately verify if it solves the solution.) I have a routine that solves in under 9 minutes with my 1GFLOP machine.
PS There is a lot of degrees of freedom. This one set of numbers solves over 35K solutions. Changing the bottom "31" to "44" finds 4 solutions. Changing the order (Yes, I solve one number at a time.) so 44 is first will solve in 2 seconds. Changing the win interface so it displays every intermediate solution solves in less than 8 minutes.

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