Hi - it's me again. I have the following code but don't exactly know what it means or how to make the opposite code. The code I currently have is

#define rotateleft(x,n) ((x<<n) | (x>>(32-n)))   
#define rotateright(x,n) ((x>>n) | (x<<(32-n)))

Then can be used like the following

a = rotateleft(123,456)
b = rotateright(123,456)

But as for the question, I have the values a and b stored. But now I need to reverse the formula so I get parameter 1 back (123). So say in the above code I have value a, I put it through a function then it should be 123 just like b. So how exactly do I do that because none of this makes any sense. Please help... Thanks.

The macro functions rotateleft and rotateright perform binary shift operations, shifting the binary value of x by n places in the appropriate direction using the << and >> binary shift operators.

So using some smaller, more sensible values for x and n (e.g. x=4 n=2);
if we now did something like:

x= rotateleft(x,n);

Using my example values for x and n, we know that x==4.
In binary 4 is represented as:
100

if we shift the binary value of x (4), n places to the left (n==2 remember), we get this..
10000
Which is the binary representation of the number 16.

So the value of x would become 16.

To get the original value of x back, you need to call rotateright passing x and n, which will output the value that results from shifting x (16) to the right by n (2) places.
So we'd call this:

x = rotateright(x,n);

This time the value of x is 16. n is still 2.
16 in binary is:
10000

shifting 2 places to the right gives you the binary value:
100

Which is the number 4 (the original value of x!)

Just in case you're not 100% clear, have a butchers at this simple example:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

#define rotateleft(x,n) ((x<<n) | (x>>(32-n)))   
#define rotateright(x,n) ((x>>n) | (x<<(32-n)))

using std::cout;
using std::endl;

void output(const std::string &message, const int &x, const int &n)
{
	cout << message << endl << "x=" << x << " n=" << n << endl << endl;
}

int main()
{
	// set initial values for x and n
	int x = 4, n = 2;

	// output values to console
	output("Initial values:", x, n);

	// perform left shift and output values
	x = rotateleft(x, n);
	output("After rotate left:", x, n);
	// NOTE: we've modified the value of x  in the above call to rotateleft.
	// if we wanted to perform the left shift and store the result in a separate variable 
	// while keeping the original value of x we'd use something like:
	// int num1 = rotateleft(x,n)


	// perform right shift and output
	x = rotateright(x, n);
	output("After rotate right:", x, n);
	// NOTE: Again, we've modified the value of x.
	// if you used the commented out line from the previous comment block
	// e.g. int num1 = rotateleft;
	// To get the value of num1 back to the original value of x you could use:
	// num1 = rotateright(num1, n); // <<- modifying num1
	// OR
	// int num2 = rotateright(num1, n); // <<- storing result in a separate variable.

	return  0;
}

I hope that clears things up for you.
Cheers for now,
Jas.

ps. in the context of your original post:

int a = rotateleft(123,456);
int b = rotateright(123,456);

To get a and b back to 123 you could do this:

a = rotateright(a, 456);
b = rotateleft(b,456);

OR

int c = rotateright(a, 456);
int d = rotateleft(b, 456);

But you should also note that there is some code in the macro functions to limit the shifted numbers to 32 bits.
e.g. in rotateleft:
(x << n) shifts x by n places to the left, but this value is then OR'ed with the value of x shifted to the right by 32-n to give the final result. So I don't think it will work well with particularly large numbers for x or n.

456 is certainly far too big for n. n should be somewhere between 1 and 31 (shifting x by 32 places in either direction will give you x!)

Edited 6 Years Ago by JasonHippy: p.s.

...shifting x by 32 places in either direction will give you x!

I don't think this is correct. I'll admit, I'm still figuring out bitwise operators myself, but last I knew they don't wrap around. (Still looking for reference where I read it.)

The way I understand it is if you shift a '1'-bit off the left end, it does not come back around to the right end as a '1'. It's simply replaced with a '0'. The same is true for a right shift.

EDIT: Found the reference...

As bits are shifted off one end, 0's are brought in the other end. (In the case of a signed, negative integer, a right shift will cause a 1 to be brought in so that the sign bit is preserved.) Remember, a shift is not a rotate. (emphasis added by Fbody) That is, the bits shifted off one end do not come back around to the other. The bits shifted off are lost.

Edited 6 Years Ago by Fbody: n/a

Nuts, ran out of edit time.

This code should demonstrate that fact:

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>

using std::cout;
using std::cin;
using std::setw;

int main() {
	int num = 1;

	for (int i = 0; i < (8*sizeof(int)+3); i++) {
		cout << "after shift#" << setw(3) << i << ", num = " << num << "\n";
		num = num << 1;
	}
	cin.get();
}

It starts with a '1' in the far right position and shifts if left until it shifts it off the left end. It then performs 3 more for demonstration purposes.

Coincidentally, this also gives you the base-10 value of each position in a signed 32-bit binary number...

Edited 6 Years Ago by Fbody: n/a

But if you take another look at the code that is being used in the rotateleft and rotateright functions in the OP, it's not just a straight shift, there actually is some rotation going on. (or at least something equally as cunning!)

There are two operations in the rotateleft and rotateright functions. The first operation is a straightforward shift of x by n places in the relevant direction, but the result of the first operation is OR'ed with the result of the second operation. The second operation shifts x by 32-n places in the opposite direction.

Try running my code and vary the values a little and you'll see.
Perhaps keep x as 4 (or something easily predictable) and try varying the value of n.
In fact if you set n to 32, you'll find that the result of shifting x by 32 places in either direction (using rotateleft or rotateright) results in the value of x staying the same.


[EDIT] In fact, because it actually does rotate, try n as 64, 96, 128 or any other multiple of 32 and the result will be x.

Cheers for now,
Jas.

Edited 6 Years Ago by JasonHippy: n/a

456 is certainly far too big for n. n should be somewhere between 1 and 31 (shifting x by 32 places in either direction will give you x!)

This is the statement you were referring to, just to clarify things here I should really have written:

456 is certainly far too big for n. n should be somewhere between 1 and 31 (shifting x by 32 places using rotateleft or rotateright will give you x!)

[edit] But as there is rotation going on, I guess that entire statement is actually pretty redundant!

Edited 6 Years Ago by JasonHippy: n/a

Hi - it's me again. I have the following code but don't exactly know what it means or how to make the opposite code. The code I currently have is

#define rotateleft(x,n) ((x<<n) | (x>>(32-n)))   
#define rotateright(x,n) ((x>>n) | (x<<(32-n)))

Then can be used like the following

a = rotateleft(123,456)
b = rotateright(123,456)

But as for the question, I have the values a and b stored. But now I need to reverse the formula so I get parameter 1 back (123). So say in the above code I have value a, I put it through a function then it should be 123 just like b. So how exactly do I do that because none of this makes any sense. Please help... Thanks.

Use an unsigned value to be rotated.

#include <iostream>
#include <climits>

#define UINT_BITS ( CHAR_BIT * sizeof(unsigned int) )
#define rotateleft(x,n)  ( (x << n) | ( x >> (UINT_BITS - n) ) )   
#define rotateright(x,n) ( (x >> n) | ( x << (UINT_BITS - n) ) )

int main() 
{
   unsigned int value = 123;
   for ( int i = 0; i < UINT_BITS + 3; i++ )
   {
      unsigned int a = rotateleft(value, i);
      unsigned int b = rotateright(a, i);
      std::cout << "value = " << value 
                << ", shift = " << i 
                << ", a = " << a 
                << ", b = " << b << "\n";
   }
   return 0;
}

/* my output
value = 123, shift = 0, a = 123, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 1, a = 246, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 2, a = 492, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 3, a = 984, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 4, a = 1968, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 5, a = 3936, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 6, a = 7872, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 7, a = 15744, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 8, a = 31488, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 9, a = 62976, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 10, a = 125952, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 11, a = 251904, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 12, a = 503808, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 13, a = 1007616, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 14, a = 2015232, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 15, a = 4030464, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 16, a = 8060928, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 17, a = 16121856, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 18, a = 32243712, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 19, a = 64487424, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 20, a = 128974848, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 21, a = 257949696, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 22, a = 515899392, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 23, a = 1031798784, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 24, a = 2063597568, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 25, a = 4127195136, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 26, a = 3959422977, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 27, a = 3623878659, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 28, a = 2952790023, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 29, a = 1610612751, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 30, a = 3221225502, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 31, a = 2147483709, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 32, a = 123, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 33, a = 246, b = 123
value = 123, shift = 34, a = 492, b = 123
*/
Comments
You know c++, there is no end to your talents young man!

But if you take another look at the code that is being used in the rotateleft and rotateright functions in the OP, it's not just a straight shift, there actually is some rotation going on. (or at least something equally as cunning!)

There are two operations in the rotateleft and rotateright functions. The first operation is a straightforward shift of x by n places in the relevant direction, but the result of the first operation is OR'ed with the result of the second operation. The second operation shifts x by 32-n places in the opposite direction.

Try running my code and vary the values a little and you'll see.
Perhaps keep x as 4 (or something easily predictable) and try varying the value of n.
In fact if you set n to 32, you'll find that the result of shifting x by 32 places in either direction (using rotateleft or rotateright) results in the value of x staying the same.


[EDIT] In fact, because it actually does rotate, try n as 64, 96, 128 or any other multiple of 32 and the result will be x.

Cheers for now,
Jas.

I laid the shifts out in a spreadsheet, I see how it works now. Thanks for the info...

@Dave:
Thx for using a variation of my code :). That helped me see it a little better too.

@OP:
Sorry if you feel hijacked, that was not my intent... :(

Edited 6 Years Ago by Fbody: n/a

Ooops, good point Dave. Nicely done!

I should've been using unsigned ints in my code too. I completely forgot to take the sign into consideration. The rotate functions in the OP's code won't work with negative numbers! {kicking self!}

I toyed with the idea of doing something like your UINT_BITS definition to get the actual system size, but admittedly I would've ended up doing it for int... Tut! I should've thought it through! However, I decided to run with the hard-coded 32 that the OP posted in their code.

Anyways, hats off to the Davester!

Jas.

One more note on the rotate function:

Because the bitshift operators can take negative numers as the rvalue aruments, there is not really a need for two macros. You can simply use a negative index to rotate in the opposite direction:

#include <iostream>
#include <climits>

#define UINT_BITS ( CHAR_BIT * sizeof(unsigned int) )
#define rotateleft(x,n)  ( (x << n) | ( x >> (UINT_BITS - n) ) )
#define rotateright(x,n) ( (x >> n) | ( x << (UINT_BITS - n) ) )

using namespace std;

int main()
{
   unsigned int value = 123;
   unsigned int a = rotateleft(value, 7);
   cout << "after rotate left: " << a << endl;
   a = rotateright(value, -7);
   cout << "after negative rotate right: " << a << endl;
   return 0;
}

output"

after rotate left: 15744
after negative rotate right: 15744

Of course, there is no harm in having both declared, in fact, it may improve readability to have both. I just felt compelled to but in and add the extra info.

This question has already been answered. Start a new discussion instead.