Please tell me why this doesn't work:

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
	char felix[3] = "ho";
	if(felix == "ho")
		cout << felix;
}

You can't use the comparison-operator (==) on char-arrays to check if the arrays contain the same values.
Two ways around this:

  1. Use std::strings (personal favorite):

    std::string felix = "ho";
    if(felix == "ho")
    cout << felix;

  2. Use strcmp

    char felix[3] = "ho";
    if(strcmp(felix, "ho") == 0) //are the same
    cout << felix;

Edited 3 Years Ago by happygeek: fixed formatting

if(felix == "ho")

Change this line to if(strcmp(felix,"ho") == 0)

Also make sure you put return 0; at the end of your int main function.

Edited 3 Years Ago by mike_2000_17: Fixed formatting

You're confusing the lax C++string container method with the C way.

http://www.thinkage.ca/english/gcos/expl/c/lib/strcmp.html
http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/string/operators/

edit:
Wow, everyone replied at the same time.

Yep, they sure did. What the hell, I'll post mine anyway.

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
	char felix[3] = "ho";
	if(felix == "ho")
		cout << "1. This will not execute\n";

	if(strcmp (felix, "ho") == 0)
		cout << "2. This will execute.\n";

	string felix2 = "ho";
	if(felix2 == "ho")
		cout << "3. This will execute.\n";


    char* felix3 = felix;

    cout << "Address felix points to " <<  (void*) felix << "\n";
    cout << "Address felix3 points to " << (void*) felix3 << "\n";

    if (felix == felix3)
		cout << "4. This will execute.\n";

    return 0;
}
Comments
I like this--helps

Ok, thanks for the advice guys.

Another question: If I were to switch to a string array, is possible to store this into a file?

#include<iostream>
#include<fstream>
#include<string>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
	string name[2];
	ifstream fromfile("test.txt");
	for(int x=0;x<2;x++)
		fromfile >> name[x];
	fromfile.close();
	ofstream tofile("test.txt");
	for(int x=0;x<2;x++)
		tofile << name[x] << endl;
	tofile.close();
	if(name[0]!="Gof")
		cout << name[0];
	cout << name[0];
}

Edit: Just realized that I didn't put an 'if' statement in to verify whether the file is operable. -- minor implication.

Edited 6 Years Ago by restrictment: n/a

edit:
Wow, everyone replied at the same time.

It's nice to see that we all agree with each-other :)

>> Another question: If I were to switch to a string array, is possible to store this into a file?

Yes:

ofstream myfile ("example.txt");
  std::string bla = "something";
  if (myfile.is_open())
    myfile << bla;

Edited 6 Years Ago by Nick Evan: n/a

A constant sized array is fine if you only ever require that size. Check out <vector> if you want a dynamic solution.

Comments
Good advice

Alright, I decided not to switch to a string. Thanks for the advice. If I have further questions, I will ask later. Topic solved.

Edited 6 Years Ago by restrictment: n/a

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