Hi Folks --

I'm an old Borland C++ 4.52 guy who used to rock at OWL and BDE in the 90's, but I'm not a programmer anymore. I still keep my fingers in it -- I've been maintaining a hobby app using my old BC++ 4.52 compiler from '95, and I run the app on a daily basis.

I just got a new PC that runs Windows 7 (Home), and it won't let me load the old compiler OR run the app. I *could* get Windows 7 Professional, and it would run the old stuff, but I'm taking this as a warning, it's time to update my tools. How about C++ Builder then? ... I'm on my 30 day trial.


OWL is gone and BDE, though still available, is on its way out.

I'm OK with OWL being gone (the IDE is letting me build my UI easily enough), but I'm in trouble with the database side...

I just need to read four Paradox tables into an array so I can perform wicked and diabolical graphic analysis on them.

I see all these database tools in the Tools Palette, I can drag and drop them onto the form, but then what? I don't know what does what and the documentation merely lists parameters without saying what does what and how everything fits together.

There has to be an easy way to read four Paradox tables on the same machine and a code sample that demonstrates how to do it, but I keep finding articles telling me how to build separate database servers and and multi-tiered whiz bang... COME ON - I just want to read my stinking four Paradox tables (13000 rows and growing daily).



Since you have to switch compilers anyway why not switch to one that is completely free for you to use as long as you want to use it? Code::Blocks with MinGW compiler and VC++ 2010 Express come to mind -- there are others too. Of course you may have to update your Paradox database engine if you are still using the same on you got in the 1990s. The newer engines support ODBC which can easily be used on any modern compiler and on Windows 7 too.

There are lots of information on the net about how to use ODBC in your c and c++ programs. There are even a couple free c++ classes. Just use google and you will find them.

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