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Hi.

Implicit: the compiler does the work for you

Explicit: you have to specify what you would like the compiler to do.


are the above statements true?

I have just read on MSDN that an abstract method is implicity virtual. One is not implemented and one is, so is this saying that an abstract method is treated as virtual by the compiler?

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Last Post by ddanbe
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Correct.
This is an example

int i = 42;
            double d = i; //implicit conversion
            double dd = (double)i; //explicit conversion, in this case not needed
            //d and dd become 42.0

An abstract method is implicity virtual, so you can override it.

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