Hi all,

I've programmed C & C++ during my college days. I understood its OO model and coded many examples (this helped me in OO PHP now). I used something called Turbo C++, a set of some confusing files, which can be carried in a floppy or two.

I now have to ask: What is C++?

I know Java is by Sun and it is freely available downloadable as JDK, JRE and Tomat. These things can be used to deploy servets (complied code), etc. for a Web application. A real-world Web site often uses Redhat Linux, Apache, Tomcat, PHP, and MySQL, to deploy a Web application.

I heard Perl, which can be used for writing fast server-side code for Web application.

I know PHP, that can be used easily for dynamic Web sites.

I heard Redhat linux, which is non-free and used to deploy robust Web servers.

What is C++? Who is its vendor? Is it free? From, where they maintain latest version of it available for the public download? Is it can be use quickly for a real-world example? C++ to CGI? C++ to Web?

Though, I programmed C++, I'm not even able to get these answers :confused:

If someone, ask me that (while interviewing), I can't be able to satisfy h'm with my answers :rolleyes:

What you people have to say about this :?:

C++ was invented by Bjarne Stroustrup, a professor at Texas A&M. It evolved from the C language.. and was originally referred to as, "C with Classes." The International Standards Organization now governs the c++ language.

Here is a good interview with Bjarne that will answer a lot of ye' questions. For a more comprehensive list of interviews, click here. Also, be sure to check out The Design and Evolution of C++

>Where can I download C++?
You don't download C++, it's a programming language. You don't download Java or Perl either, they're just languages. What you download is a compiler for C++, or an interpreter for Perl, or the development kit for Java. Too many people mistake their compiler for the language they're using, and it causes untold confusion and frustration.

>What is C++?
A general programming language based off of C.

>Who is its vendor?
It's not a software package, it's a language. There's no vendor of C++ itself.

>Is it free?
Yes, provided you have a compiler.

>From, where they maintain latest version of it available for the public download?
The latest "version" of C++ is document called ISO/IEC 14882:2003. That's the ISO standard definition of the language, and it's not freely available, nor would you want it unless you're already very comfortable with the language.

>Is it can be use quickly for a real-world example?
For a real world example? Pick any piece of software that you use. Chances are good that it was written primarily in C++.

>C++ to CGI?
C++ can be used for CGI.

Thanks for all the replies.

Go to
http://www.bloodshed.net/devcpp.html

Yes, I downloaded that a fortnight before! What can I do with that .exe file. During college days, I used Turbo C++ :surprised

You don't download Java or Perl either, they're just languages.

I read this complicated theory before. I downloaded Perl from their Web site and Java from Sun and Apache. I written and ran few examples also. Please explain.

There's no vendor of C++ itself.

There's clear understanding of HTML, JavaScript, JScript, RSS, Atom, JDK, Tomcat, Perl vendors to me .. But, I'm really confused about C++. Who is Borland? Who is Turbo C++? What is C++ compilers? If I write a C++ program, will it run with all the C++ GUI/IDE editors?

The latest "version" of C++ is document called ISO/IEC 14882:2003, not freely available.

Why not free to read? Like HTML, XML, Atom are all free .. :?:

C++ can be used for CGI.

I thought Perl is CGI? I can run a Perl script and rename it with .pl or .cgi extension; it doesn't matter! Do, I rename my C++ program as .cgi? How can it run online .. :!:

Please help me: I'm very much confused .. (I knew now .. I remained confused all the time, in the college also ..)

I thought Perl is CGI? I can run a Perl script and rename it with .pl or .cgi extension; it doesn't matter! Do, I rename my C++ program as .cgi? How can it run online .. :!:

Please help me: I'm very much confused .. (I knew now .. I remained confused all the time, in the college also ..)

CGI stands for Common Gateway Interface. It's not a programming language; it's a way by which web servers (such as Apache) communicate with server-side programs. These programs can be written in any language, such as Perl, Python, C++, and Lisp, and they can be interpreted or compiled. The web server sets some environment variables and starts up the program, possibly sending some information through standard input, and the program writes the HTTP response, with HTML or maybe an image, to standard output.

For example, here's a tutorial called Getting Started with CGI Programming in C, though I wouldn't recommend using C or C++ as a first choice for CGI programming.

I read this complicated theory before. I downloaded Perl from their Web site and Java from Sun and Apache. I written and ran few examples also. Please explain.

Perl is the name of a programming language. Java is the name of a programming language.

"Java" is also the common name of an interpreter distributed by Sun that runs compiled programs written in the Java programming language.

Programs written in the Perl programming language are interpreted by "perl," which is a Perl interpreter. This is not the only Perl interpreter, though. There's a Perl 6 interpreter known as "Pugs."

[Edit: Ack, sorry for the double post.]

Yes, I downloaded that a fortnight before! What can I do with that exe file. During college days, I used Turbo C :surprised

>>exe is the extension name given to the executable file generated by your compiler/linker/IDE. Running that file on a computer with appropriate software support will allow the end user to use the program you wrote.


I read this complicated theory before. I downloaded Perl from their Web site and Java from Sun and Apache. I written and ran few examples also. Please explain.

>>You can use Dev-C++ to write programs in C/C++ just like you did with Turbo-C/C++ you had before. It's just that the current version of Dev-C++ is likely to be more up to date than the version of Turbo-C/C++ that you used to use.

There's clear understanding of HTML, JavaScript, JScript, RSS, Atom, JDK, Tomcat, Perl vendors to me .. But, I'm really confused about C++. Who is Borland? Who is Turbo C++? What is C++ compilers? If I write a C++ program, will it run with all the C++ GUI/IDE editors?

>>There are a number of companies who make software which can be used to write programs using the C/C++ language. Some popular vendors are Microsoft, Borland, Dev-C++, etc. Each of these vendors has a bundle of software called Integrated Development Environments (IDE) that include a compiler, linker, and other software needed to develop executable files which are what the end user uses to run the program you write. There are a number of other compilers/linkers available from other sources as well.

Why not free to read? Like HTML, XML, Atom are all free .. :?:

Dev-C++ is free. The stuff from MS an Borland is often purchased, though both vendors have been known to have the bare bones products available for free from time to time.

>I read this complicated theory before. I downloaded Perl from
>their Web site and Java from Sun and Apache. I written and ran few examples also. Please explain.
What's there to explain? It's common sense. Do you go to the store and buy English? No, you buy books written using English. Likewise, you download software written using programming languages. But you don't download a programming language just like you don't go out and buy a spoken language. You downloaded the Perl interpreter, and the Java development kit, not the languages that they implement. In real world terms, you didn't go out and buy English, you bought a typewriter so that you could write English.

>There's clear understanding of HTML, JavaScript, JScript,
>RSS, Atom, JDK, Tomcat, Perl vendors to me ..
No, clearly there isn't or you wouldn't even be remotely confused.

>Who is Borland? Who is Turbo C++?
Borland is a company that sells a C++ compiler, Turbo C++ is one of those compilers sold by Borland. That's why it's called Borland Turbo C++. But that doesn't really matter because Turbo C++ is old as dirt and you shouldn't be using it in the first place.

>What is C++ compilers?
[oversimplification]
A C++ compiler is a program that takes a text file with C++ code and turns it into an executable program.
[/oversimplification]

>If I write a C++ program, will it run with all the C++ GUI/IDE editors?
This is a very good question. The answer is (one that you'll see a lot) maybe. Assuming you write code that conforms to the C++ standard and use a compiler that correctly compiles conforming code, yes. Otherwise, such as if you use a compiler extension, probably not.

>Why not free to read? Like HTML, XML, Atom are all free ..
You're really confused about this "language is not a product" thing. The C++ standard is a book, that you buy, for money, because that's how ISO makes money. It's not free because they choose not to make it free.

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