I am currently a C# developer with about a year of experience. I am currently working on finishing my computer science degree with a minor in mathematics.

I love the job that I am in, but I the things I really want to do are in C++ (i.e. game development, firmware, scientific development, working for a software company).

How hard is it for a C# or Java programmer to transition to C++ development? Also, I was wondering what would make me a good candidate for a game development or a job in embedded firmware development?

BTW, I have taken a few classes in C++, so I do have a pretty good grasp of the C++ syntax.

Thanks in Advance,
Brian Wimpsett

I believe that to know how to program in any language you just need a few days but to get a hold on it it takes a life time. The only difference in Java/C# and C++ that I find is in C++ you got to do many things on your own which Java and C# have inbuilt functions for,but in C++ you can play around with pointers and also screw up the entire project due to their misuse both of which are fun :) Don't think much just go for it and enjoy the essence of programming. :)

Your question is impossible to answer. How am I suppose to give a value to how difficult it will be for you?
All I know, from my own experience, is that for me it is easiest to learn a language by just starting to write a project in it. This doesn't need to be a useful program, the important thing is to start writing code, and to start shooting yourself in the foot so that you learn what not to do.

Also, print out a copy of the standard (or keep a PDF if you don't want to print ~700 pages double sided) and try to look for things in there when you're stuck, it will teach you 'how' to read the standard, and give valuable insight.

Also the game development question is difficult to answer. I imagine being _very_ comfortable with C++ is a prerequisite, it will probably also help if you've made a game yourself, or helped in developing an open source game (and you can prove that you did).
But this is all just guessing, don't expect to become good enough in C++ within a year though.

This article has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.