Create a class named Pizza. Data fields include a string for toppings (such as pepperoni), an integer for diameter in inches (such as 12), and a double for price (such as 13.99). Include properties to get and set values for each of these fields. Create a class named TestPizza that instantiates one Pizza object and demonstrates the use of the Pizza set and get accessors

class Pizza
    {
         string toppings;
            int diameter;
            double price;
        }

      public string Toppings
      {
          get
          {
              return this.toppings;
          }
          set
          {
              this.toppings = value;
          }
      }

public int Diameter 
{ 
get
{
return this.diameter;
}
set
{
this.diameter = value;
}
}
public double Price 
{ 
get 
{
return this.price;
}
set 
{
this.price = value;
}
}
      public class TestPizza
          {
          public static void main(String[] args)
          {
  
              Pizza p = new Pizza();
              p.Toppings = "pepperoni, cheese, mushrooms";
              p.Diameter = 12;
              p.Price = 13.99;
              Console.WriteLine("Topping: " + p.getTopping());
              Console.WriteLine("Diameter: " + p.getDiameter());
              Console.WriteLine("Price: " + p.getPrice()); 
}

}

Expected class, delegate, enum, interface, or struct is the error that i am getting with: public string toppings,public int Diameter and public double Price.

Check your opening { and closing } throughout your file. The sample you provided closes the class very early in your code...

check the brackets, all are in place. Rebuild the program and it is now giving the following errors:
1. The variable 'toppings' ,'diameter', and 'price'is declared but never used.
2. Program does not contain a definition for 'toppings', 'diameter' and 'price'.
3. The type or namespace name 'Pizza' could not be found

if i remove the bracket from line 6, the error said } expected.

Remove the bracket from 6th line and place it before public class TestPizza starts.

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