using Visual Studio ?

Also, Is there a different name for classes in C# when it comes to Java?

is an object in Java and a method in C# similar?

Edited 3 Years Ago by silvercats

System.Windows will be.. java.awt.* ., what do you mean by VI? In C# MessageBox.Show and in VB it is MSGBOX

Edited 3 Years Ago by BhuvanRam

Is there a way to see the codes of classes like "messagebox", using Visual Studio 2010?

Not really. The best you will get is the metadata that is built up from the .NET Framework.

Classes are objects and Object is also a type. Objects are not methods.
Methods in Java and C# are the same.

VisualStudio includes Intellisense, which allows you to see the accessible members of an object you can call.

Edited 3 Years Ago by Ketsuekiame

Can you claify your questions please? You've started a question in the thread title and finished it in the post itself and it's not very clear.

Also, Is there a different name for classes in C# when it comes to Java?

Yes objects in both Java and C# will have a class behind them but they may have different names (e.g. GridView is the Java version of C# DataGridView). Java may also have some object that C# doesn't and vice versa.

is an object in Java and a method in C# similar?

No, object in Java are the same as objects in C# in that they are an object (e.g. a textBox object represents the textBox on your screen and defines the properties and functionality for the textBox). Objects in both Java and C# contain methods which provide the functionality for that object.

Is there a way to see the codes of classes like "messagebox", using Visual Studio 2010?

It's usually hiden so that it can't be changed but it's properties can be set and it's built in methods can be used.

Best thing to do is to get a book about the fundamentals of object oriented programming, I can't remember the name of the book I used but I'll post it for you if I can dig it out. Also have a look at C-Sharp station, it has a some good tutorials that you might find useful...

Try the .NET decompiler by jetBrains

Second this. I have actually used this for competitions that involve where you have to revese engineer code. This is the only C# one that I found to work (if this is what you are looking for)

This article has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.