Go to Project --> <Project name> Properties (last menu item) --> Configuration Properties --> Linker --> Input. Then in the right pane, add the lib name in the first item Additional Dependencies.

Under Linker --> General, add the complete path to the lib in Additional Library Directories.

An alternative to the first paragraph above is to use a pragma in one of the *.c or *.cpp files

#pragma comment(lib, "libcurses.lib")

how to use it?

The same way you would use standard C libraries, include the *.h file in the *.c or *.cpp file that is going to use the functions in the library. If you're asking how to use PDCurses I think you will find tutorials if you just google for them.

A warning about using PDCurses -- it is a Windows port of a very very old *nix program which I believe even predates Windows 95. I used it on Unix in the mid 1980s. I don't know how well it works on modern Windows such as Windows 7/8/8.1.

Edited 2 Years Ago by Ancient Dragon

Thank you for your reply! Is it right to say that as long as a library has proper header files and .lib files I can use it without any problems?

When using this

#pragma comment(lib, "libcurses.lib")

where should the libcurses.lib be? and what if it's in another forlder?

I already explained in the second paragraph how to tell the compiler where to find the lib files.

Is it right to say that as long as a library has proper header files and .lib files I can use it without any problems?

Generally, yes, as long as the lib was generated by the same compiler. AFAIK libs generated by GNU and Borland compilers are not compatible with Microsoft compilers.

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