I need help to display on the screen rock when user picks rock, paper when user picks paper, and scissors when user picks scissors. Thanks

graphics.h was a header file released with some compilers back in the eighties and early nineties (i.e. twenty years ago) that enabled a programmer to use a very custom library (also provided wit hthat compiler) to show simple graphics on the systems of the day.

Are you programming for MSDOS in the year 1990? I bet you're using Turbo C++ from twenty years ago too. If you're learning, using twenty year old tools is a bad idea.

If you're using a modern computer, you should consider moving to a modern compiler and a modern IDE. You can still use a header named graphics.h because people have rewritten it repeatedly over the decades for modern computers, but there are also more modern options available for drawing lines.

Edited 1 Year Ago by Moschops

Our professor told us to use that header, but really, he didn't teach us anything about it yet he insists we make a program displaying rock, paper, or scissors. Can you please explain a little bit how it works or give an example code of (for example, scissors) Thanks a lot!

Our professor told us to use that header, but really, he didn't teach us anything about it yet he insists we make a program displaying rock, paper, or scissors. Can you please explain a little bit how it works or give an example code of (for example, scissors) Thanks a lot!

You could use a 'Table Look Up' method ...

I need help to display on the screen rock when user picks rock, paper when user picks paper, and scissors when user picks scissors. Thanks

// define table ...
const char* CHOICES[] = { "ROCK", "PAPER", "SCISSORS" };

// function prototype ...
int takeInValidIntInRange( const char* prompt, int min, int max );


// in main ...

cout << "Choices are ";
for( int i = 0; i < 3; ++ i ) cout << "(" << (i+1) << ") " << CHOICES[i] << " ";
cout << endl;

int choice = takeInValidIntInRange( "Enter an integer in the range 1..3: ", 1, 3 );

cout << "Your choice was: " << CHOICES[choice-1] << endl;

Edited 1 Year Ago by David W

I'm sorry for the misunderstanding. I want to 'display' or depict the image of a rock when user picks rock, scissors when scissors, and paper when user picks paper.

I am going to give you the same advice I give all the students who come here whose professors' are requring them to use Turbo C++ for current-day coursework:

  • Stand up in class, explain to your fellow students that the professor is teaching out-of-date and useless information that will hinder your ability to work in programming in the future,
  • Walk out of the course and encourage as many other classmates as you can to do so as well,
  • Go to the Dean's office and petition for the professor to be removed on the grounds of incompetence.

There is absolutely no justification for using Turbo C++ in an era when it won't even run on most new systems. Modern, powerful and effective compilers and IDEs which support modern versions of the language and present-day programming techniques are freely available from multiple sources, including Microsoft. To still be using and teaching a compiler that is older than most of the students using it is nothing short of criminal.

Edited 1 Year Ago by Schol-R-LEA

This article has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.