0

I'm writing small command line programs that for instance numerically solve systems of differential equations. The programs are so simple, that I think it would be an overkill to use a development environment like MS Visual Studio or Anjunta. I'm progamming on a Linux computer, and I use Gedit to edit the source files and g++ to compile. Gedit nicely highlights C++ code and g++ tells me what lines contains errors, however, finding runtime errors in the code is a bit more tedious. Usually I have to insert cout << "Still works here"; in the code at several points and see if it prints. I remember from MSVS that it showed the place in the code were it went wrong with a big arrow. Quite handy. Do you know any program that does this on Linux computers?

3
Contributors
3
Replies
4
Views
11 Years
Discussion Span
Last Post by joe_blow
0

/usr/bin/gdb
This is the command line debugger.

/usr/bin/ddd
This is the 'visual' wrapper around gdb.
You can use this to point at lines of code, insert breakpoints, examine variables etc.

0

I've always used the free Borland compiler. I love it. You can write anything from simple commandline to full Window apps with it. I'm sorry I don't know if it's compatible with Linux though.

This topic has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.
Have something to contribute to this discussion? Please be thoughtful, detailed and courteous, and be sure to adhere to our posting rules.