I am a beginner that is learning C++. I would like to now how everyone else learnt C++.

Don't forget to get a compiler and do the exercises. :)
You can find a lot of them in a sticky thread at the top of this forum. It's a nice collection to get started on almost all aspects of C++.

I wouldn't say how did you learn C++, because honestly majority if not everyone is still learning. I will be first to put my hand up :) I have been using C++ for almost 3 years know quite a bit but i still seem to learn something interesting quite often :)

Anyway the two links vishesh posted are good. I especially love the first one :) Helped me when i was starting off with C++ ;)

Also alot of people will be telling you to use Dev-CPP i would probably stick with Visual C++ :D

Comments
Yep, it's a never ending process learning C++

I am a beginner that is learning C++. I would like to now how everyone else learnt C++.

ive learned it the hardway. from scratch i have to do intermediate programming modules in a day or two. (the basics are just inserted during research time) <- this is not a good idea

since its requird for work i cant do anything about it.

my advice is get a solid foundation of this language. (it language can get unsafe if you miss use it)

ive learned it the hardway. from scratch i have to do intermediate programming modules in a day or two. (the basics are just inserted during research time) <- this is not a good idea

Same experience with me, which is veeeerrryy baadd...

Some advice about books: try to get a book that works on and develops one single program as it progresses, from basics to objects and whatever else..

It's better than books with hundreds of little shitty exercises, because (a) you learn faster, (b) its more incentive to go onto the next chapter.. coz you're working towards a goal, and not a bunch of useless compound interest calculators..

>It's better than books with hundreds of little shitty exercises
>and not a bunch of useless compound interest calculators..
A tad bitter, are we? There's a difference between learning a language and learning how to program. Most books are written as learning a language, where small exercises and programs that show a single feature are ideal. There are far fewer books that develop a single program across the chapters because that teaches how to program, and it's closer to reading a book to learn a martial art. It's not as effective of a teaching technique as you're suggesting.

>It's better than books with hundreds of little shitty exercises
>and not a bunch of useless compound interest calculators..
A tad bitter, are we? There's a difference between learning a language and learning how to program. Most books are written as learning a language, where small exercises and programs that show a single feature are ideal. There are far fewer books that develop a single program across the chapters because that teaches how to program, and it's closer to reading a book to learn a martial art. It's not as effective of a teaching technique as you're suggesting.

I'm not bitter lol..
I use both kinds, so I don't know which is more effective, but personally I find them more useful and interesting. And when I need some quick reference, online is usually the best place to look..

To the original poster: have a look at this book
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbninquiry.asp?isbn=0672324253

>To the original poster: have a look at this book
I'm a bit biased in that I actually have a clue, but I'm not a fan of Jesse Liberty's writing. He has a tendency to over complicate the world and I've regularly felt the need to question his proficiency in C++.

IMO, building up a strong logic is more important than learning X++, Y++ or any other language as a matter of fact. Queues will be queues, stacks will be stacks, binary trees would be based on the same principle, no matter which programming language.

Like I always say, if you have started programming for a living, concentrate on the language, get used to the API. If you have started programming for gaining knowledge or academic reasons, building up good concepts would be more like it, the expertise of the language would follow with time.

I was forced to learn it in school. Kind of one unsightly language, and lots of things to trip over, but you get used to that! We used Dev-Cpp (GNU CPP) and I still use that.

I would say that you first start reading the book acoording to your course and if you have any queries,solve it in this forum.I think that is the best way to reach your goal.
Practice makes a person perfect.
So you could even try out simple problems given here and in whichever book you are following .
Focus initially on basic fundamentals-like datatypes,loops,functions,constructors,pointers and classes and objects.
You will find them at cplusplus.com easily.
Then proceed towards building up of complex ideas which even I find difficult.There is nothing to be worried about.You have to be simple in approach.Your view shold be crystal clear about what you come across. May it might help you.
Get the latest information regarding everything if not from the book,then you could choose this forum.
Best of luck!

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