I am currently reading about bit sizes or something..

is knowing these bit sizes important? Because I don't really get this, and if it's not important, I won't have to keep rereading this thing.


Type Width in Bits
byte 8 <-- is knowing this important?
short 16
int 32
long 64


I don't know if my question made sense but.. yeah, this thing is confusing me -_-
_______________________________________________________
What are:
Single-precision floating points and Double-precision floating points?

Sorry, with these stupid questions, my education level is pretty low :sad:


Thanks in advance.

why don't you dig in wikipedia ;) ?

Good idea! Forgot about that, I only tried googling it :D

Sorry, I can't find the edit button for some reason.. I swear I found it last time..


anyways.. I still have trouble understanding what


Single-precision floating points and Double-precision floating points are


I now have a clue of what bits are

Single Precision numbers (4 bytes storage) have 23 bits for mantissa i.e. approximately 7 decimal digits. Eg. 1.123456

Double precision numbers (8 bytes storage) have 52 bits for mantissa i.e. approximately 16 decimal digits as their precision.

Floating point numbers have two properties, accuracy and precision.

Accuracy is layman's terms is the biggest number that can be represented and depends on the number of exponent bits (8 bits in single precision and 11 in double precision).

Precision is the number of digits that can occur after the decimal point. So even if your floating point numbers can represent really big numbers, they have limited precision.

Precision is the number of digits that can occur after the decimal point. So even if your floating point numbers can represent really big numbers, they have limited precision.

AHH, thanks! :D!

This question has already been answered. Start a new discussion instead.