In order to traverse a tree you could use something like this:

For inorder traversal:

inorder(TreeNode* currentNode)
{
    if (currentNode) {
       inorder(currentNode->LeftChild);
       cout << currentNode->data;
       inorder(currentNode->RightChild);
    }
}

For preorder traversal:

preorder(TreeNode* currentNode)
{
    if (currentNode) {
        cout << currentNode->data;
        preorder(currentNode->LeftChild);
        preorder(currentNode->RightChild);
    }
}

For post order traversal:

postorder(TreeNode* currentNode)
{
    if (currentNode) {
        postorder(currentNode->LeftChild);
        postorder(currentNode->RightChild);
        cout << currentNode->data;
    }
}

For level order traversal:

LevelOrder(TreeNode* root)
{
   Queue q<TreeNode*>;
   TreeNode* currentNode = root;
       
    while (currentNode) {
        cout << currentNode->data;
        if (currentNode->LeftChild) q.Add(currentNode->LeftChild);
        if (currentNode->RightChild) q.Add(currentNode->RightChild);
        currentNode = q.Delete(); //q.Delete returns a node pointer
    }
}

The question is:

How can i make it a bit more graphical......
i mean that with the above methods the output is a list of numbers... is there anyway to modify this code so that i can have a nicer output?

PS: if you give example for one kind of traversal i will find the others by myself :)


Thanks again for your help....

I don't think this is easy, the ones that I have seen that look half ok are the ones that plot the tree on its side.

The ones that work the best use a gdi. Drawing that in the console window is always going to be a pain in the ...

I am currently working on a printout for level order for my data structures class. I will post it up here for you.

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inorder(TreeNode* currentNode)
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{
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if (currentNode) {
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inorder(currentNode->LeftChild);
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cout << currentNode->data;
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inorder(currentNode->RightChild);
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}
#
}

Edited 3 Years Ago by pritaeas: fixed formatting

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inorder(TreeNode* currentNode)
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{
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if (currentNode) {
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inorder(currentNode->LeftChild);
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cout << currentNode->data;
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inorder(currentNode->RightChild);
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#}
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}

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