Found a great video that CNBC did on Twitter. Look at the impact Twitter has on the major brands. [url]http://www.startaneasybusiness.com/2011/01/the-importance-of-twitter-are-you-t-w-e-e-t-i-n-g/[/url]

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Is today the worst day of the recession? A lot of people seem to think so. I’ll get into that in a moment, in an otherwise light trading day for technology stocks. I think we’re seeing a run out of tech this week and into more stable companies, especially in the consumer staples marketplace. Watching CNBC this morning I saw Grant Tinker, global portfolio manager at Axa Framlington Gemini, talking about the flight to stability. "Buy great companies at fair prices, instead of fair companies at great prices," Tinker said. He thinks that the U.S. 'nifty fifty' is a good …

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CNBC has a list of big name U.S. companies that could slide into default – meaning they won’t be able to meet their financial obligations, including paying their employees. There are a few technology companies on CNBC’s liability list, and it makes for an interesting slideshow – but only if you’re lucky enough not to be employed by any of these companies. Check out the entire list at: [url]http://www.cnbc.com/id/29640663[/url] Elsewhere, I’ve never been a big fan of solar energy, at least as a widespread, consumer-demand-type energy program that promises to solve even some of our oil dependency needs. Now it …

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Tech employees are starting to take matters into their own hands, with some apparently not above kidnapping. Our story begins in southwestern France, at a soon-to-be-closed Sony plant where employees had suffered numerous layoffs. Frustrated with the aggressive pace of the layoffs, and the seeming arrogance among Sony execs in doling out the pink slips, Sony workers “detained” Sony France chief executive Serge Foucher overnight to convince him to negotiate better terms for plant employees once the Sony site closes down in April. Shades of “9-to-5”, right? But Dabney Coleman and Dolly Parton were nowhere to be found as Serge …

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Another sliver of sunshine in the economic clouds – two of them, actually – as the U.S. service sector shrank in January, but less severely than expected, according to a report released by The Institute for Supply Management. The ISM reported that its non-manufacturing index came in at 42.9 in January compared with 40.1 in December. Analysts had expected the number to come at 39.2. Basically, any number of over 50 indicates growth, and anything under points to a weakening service sector. With thousands of technology companies firmly ensconced in the service sector, a three-percent bounce back up toward the …

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Topping the news this morning is an announcement by Citigroup that it will finally crack open its wallet, stuffed with over $45 billion tax-payer funded TARP cash, and start lending again. The financial giant had come under fire in recent months for taking the TARP money and sitting on it. Now it plans to spend $36.5 billion to issue mortgages, make credit card loans and buy distressed assets in the tight credit markets in the coming months. Now that Citigroup has taken the plunge, Wall Street can finally exhale – other lending companies should follow suit. Elsewhere Jim “Mad Money” …

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The End.