[ATTACH=RIGHT]18613[/ATTACH]The term Net Neutrality has been the subject of heavy discussion for the past several years. The freedom to go where and when we want to on the internet is about to slip away. Big telecoms and internet giants like AT&T, Comcast, Verizon, Time Warner and even Google have met with the government and came up with a set of rules that will allow them to regulate and prioritize what we see on the internet (to say the least). Yesterday Steve Wozniak, the engineer that co-founded Apple Computer, Inc. wrote an open letter the FCC imploring them to keep the …

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The big mystery of what exactly Verizon and Google were talking about behind closed doors was solved this afternoon when about 1:45 p.m. ET, the two telecom companies issued a joint policy proposal, announcing a compromise on net neutrality. Their [URL="http://www.scribd.com/doc/35599242/Verizon-Google-Legislative-Framework-Proposal"]suggestions[/URL] are legislative framework for policymakers, they said. "Google and Verizon have been working together to find ways to preserve the open Internet andthe vibrant and innovative markets it supports, to protect consumers, and to promote continued investment in broadband access. With these goals in mind, together we offer a proposed open Internet framework for the consideration of policymakers and …

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[ATTACH=RIGHT]16516[/ATTACH]On Thursday, Federal Communications Commission chair [URL="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julius_Genachowski"]Julius Genachowski[/URL] said the he found the idea of Internet service providers offering faster speeds for users willing to pay extra fees "unacceptable." His statement was in reaction to rumors earlier this week that [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/news/story302325.html"]Google and Verizon were working on an agreement[/URL] that would open the way for Verizon offering such a distinction in service. The Commission has been working on its own talks with large Internet service provider and content companies, but news that Google and Verizon might be working on a deal of their own brought the talks to a halt. [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/news/story302391.html"]Google …

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In a new development to [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/news/story302325.html"]news earlier today[/URL] that Verizon and Google were nearing an agreement that might end net neutrality, both companies have now released statements to the contrary. In Google's case, the statement came as a [URL="http://twitter.com/googlepubpolicy/statuses/20393606477"]Tweet[/URL] around mid-day Thursday. "@NYTimes is wrong. We've not had any convos with VZN about paying for carriage of our traffic. We remain committed to an open internet," the Tweet said.[ATTACH]16425[/ATTACH]Verizon had posted a similar [URL="http://policyblog.verizon.com/BlogPost/740/NewYorkTimesStoryisMistaken.aspx"]statement[/URL] on its Policy Blog shortly before that. "The NYT article regarding conversations between Google and Verizon is mistaken.  It fundamentally misunderstands our purpose," David Fish wrote. …

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Rumors surfaced today saying Verizon and Google are reportedly close to making a deal that could end net neutrality. The [URL="http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100805/ap_on_hi_te/us_tec_google_verizon"]Associated Press[/URL] reported that the two companies, which have been in talks for close to a year, may reach an agreement in the coming days. If such an agreement were reached, it would change the face of the Internet as we know it, giving telecommunications companies the ability to choose the speed and order of content delivery. It could mean faster services, but at a price to both the online sites that want their content to be top-priority and Internet …

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One might have titled this story "Beware of government bearing gifts." We should be exceedingly wary whenever law makers begin dabbling with something that's been working exceedingly well for decades. Today that thing is the Internet, perhaps the least-regulated industry in the U.S. today. This week the U.S. Federal Communications Commission is considering a set of new (and as yet unpublished) rules that would impose regulations on how broadband service providers are allowed to maintain their networks. Shrouded in the innocuous veil of "Network Neutrality," the potential restrictions are anything but neutral, and could tie the hands of service providers …

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In response to criticism of the way it was testing broadband Internet speeds, the Federal Communications Commission, following up a [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/news/story267741.html"]promise [/URL]it made last month, [URL="http://blog.broadband.gov/?entryId=359987"]announced [/URL]it had hired a vendor to help it perform more accurate tests. "In a couple of weeks, we will be asking for consumers from across the country to voluntarily install hardware in their homes (on an opt-in basis) that is capable of measuring broadband performance," said the FCC's Dave Vorhaus, an expert advisor in economic opportunity, on the FCC's blog. "The measurements will give us results across a broad swath of providers, service tiers …

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In preparation for releasing its national broadband plan tomorrow (which is already coming under [URL="http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/13/business/media/13fcc.html?adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1268658134-LNz+NNwd7fnSKyovP4YlZw"]criticism[/URL]), the Federal Communications Commission has started collecting data from users on their broadband [URL="http://broadband.gov/qualitytest/"]performance [/URL]-- a test that is also coming under criticism. Like [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/news/story219530.html"]similar [/URL]testing a couple of years ago, the broadband.gov testing suffers from one glaring flaw: it is self-selected. It's reporting the results from a self-selected group who knew about the speed test, had the time and interest and ability to take it -- and who had Internet access in the first place so that they could. But the people most likely …

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It certainly has been a roller coast ride of a month for Apple, and it continued this week with news they had allowed an iTunes competitor, [URL="http://spotify.com/"]Spotify[/URL], to place an app in the App Store surprising many industry pundits who believed they would reject it. Meanwhile, earlier this week Apple showed its petty side by issuing [URL="http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/08/27/apple_reg_take_down/"]a take-down notice on Tuesday to UK IT publisher, The Register[/URL] for posting [URL="http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2009/08/25/preview_os_apple_snow_leopard/"]a review of Snow Leopard[/URL], the new Apple OS in violation of what Apple lawyers called "confidential trade secrets." That would have been more than enough for the entire month, but …

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The good old Federal Communications Commission has finally decided, and about time to, that download speeds of up to 200Kbps cannot be sold as broadband. While those people still struggling on dial-up connections would probably disagree, the truth is that such slow connectivity really does not justify being labeled as broadband. In fact, the FCC Commissioner Deborah Taylor Tate has gone as far as saying that doing so had become "something of a running joke." As from now, then, ISPs in the US will not be allowed to get away with conning people into buying slow connections under the guise …

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It looks like internet access prices will remain steady, and could even rise, in the near future. The [url=http://www.fcc.gov]Federal Communications Commission[/url] ruled in favor of corporate America today, saying that phone companies no longer need to share high speed data lines with independent internet service providers at discounted rates. The decision was immediately hailed by lobbyists and corporate telecommunications companies, such as Verizon, and SBC Communications. It’s not surprising they’re ecstatic – the decision was a huge score for them and their team of lobbyists. In a nutshell, phone companies who own the large telecommunication networks in the United States …

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The End.