DaniWeb plans to interview [URL="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Forbes"]Steve Forbes[/URL], editor-in-chief of [URL="http://www.forbes.com/"]Forbes [business magazine][/URL]. As the new editor-in-chief of DaniWeb's News and Reviews I would like to reach out and involve the entire community and ask for your suggestions. Rather that simply asking Mr. Forbes the questions that come to my mind I would like to hear from you what you would like to know. Suggest a specific question or a general topic. Please keep it clean, respectful and relevant [to technology]. At the end of next Monday (May 17, 2010) I will review and consider all of your suggestions and come up …

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Will the tech sector lead an economic turnaround? Forbes.com thinks so. This week, Peter C. Beller writes that Monday’s IBM revenues numbers and the fallout from the proposed Oracle and Sun Microsystems could lay the groundwork for an economic rebound. I’ll get to the IBM numbers in a moment, but Beller thinks that, even though IBM’s numbers clocked in lower than analysts had expected, they show enough to indicate that technology spending may just soon be on the upswing. “Those sentiments support claims from other tech companies that a turnaround, for technology spending at least, could be on the way,” …

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Martin Sosnoff, writing in Forbes.com today, offers one of the most comprehensive, clear-minded takes on the U.S. economy in 2009. He’s not bullish on tech stocks – yet – but he is cheerleading the biotechnology sector, which could offer investors some significant upside in a year where profits will come at a premium. Here’s his capsule review of key economic indicators for this year: “At year end, the consensus for the economy and financial markets riffled into conformity. It is a mixed bag, both bullish and bearish, which means its value is probably zero. Bearish on the first half and …

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I wrote in an earlier blog about the time I met and interviewed Bill Gates, the brains behind Microsoft. I cornered Gates outside a back door at the Omni in Atlanta in 1991, where he had just delivered a speech at Comdex. Leaning on a bike stand, Gates riffed for 20 minutes on the future of technology and how, technology-wise, we had just seen the "tip of the iceberg" and that the next 20 years would "change everything". Bulls-eye. With the Internet, GPS Systems, mass commercialization of cell phones, the iPod, and Google, among other barrier-crashers, Gates was right on …

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The End.