New research published today by security vendor ZoneAlarm, the Facebook Child Safety Report, analysed what 600 kids aged between 10 and 15 and located around the world were up to Facebook. The end result reveals those common behaviours that increase the exposure of children to bullying online, predatory threat and other security problems. The major factor, surprise surprise, that contributes to an increase risk late night usage. ![dweb-facebookeferal](/attachments/small/0/dweb-facebookeferal.jpg "align-right") Three activities revealed a positive link with increased risk: adding friends that could well be strangers, playing those Facebook games which require access to account information and, as mentioned, using Facebook …

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The media seems to have been a-buzz this week following the release of the top search terms from 14.6 million searches picked up by parental control service OnlineFamily.Norton - mainly because it 'revealed' that kids are searching for sex online. I am a parent myself, of young kids, and while of course I was shocked to discover that 7 year olds were looking for porn (and that search term was in position number 4 in the 7 and under age group according to Symantec which operates the service) I certainly would not get my knickers in a twist over finding …

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There's a really interesting [URL="http://www.blahblahtech.com/2008/10/but-video-games-are-bad-for-kids-right.html"]blahblahtech[/URL] posting that has popped up to address what it refers to as the "myth that video games harm children both socially and intellectually." It approaches the debate from parental questioning perspective, which seems as good as any to be fair. Some of the research it picks up upon includes that which suggests gamers process information more quickly and multi-task better than non-gamers. I rather liked the research quote which was based upon surgeons playing Super Monkey Ball: "Surgeons who play video games three hours a week have 37 percent fewer errors and accomplish tasks 27 …

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According to a survey by [URL="http://www.BroadbandChoices.co.uk"]BroadbandChoices.co.uk[/URL], most parents in the UK are not actively monitoring what their kids are up to when using the Internet. In fact, while 40 percent of kids between the ages of 11 and 16 use Facebook and MySpace, 45 percent make new friends in chatrooms and 48 percent regularly download stuff online. Yet 84 percent of parents say they prefer to rely upon 'verbal agreements' to ensure that their children are able to surf safely. The fact that parents do not apparently know what their kids are downloading could be problematical in the UK as …

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The End.