I take security and privacy issues seriously, but sometimes I despair when news stories such as that regarding Samsung TVs eavesdropping on private conversation explode across the media as happened last week. The reason for my despondency has less to do with the data privacy debate and more to do with the human stupidity one. That said, let's get the technical bit out of the way first. The privacy scare story kicked off after someone, eventually, noticed that privacy policy relating to Samsung smart TVs included the line: "Please be aware that if your spoken words include personal or other …

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![Hello to all members! Actuall I have made an simple android app which just redirects its users to theri favorite brands' websites or online stores. I just downloaded free images of famous brands and added them in my app. When any user clicks on his favorite brand's image, app redirects the user to webiste or online store of that brand. The advantage of this app is that user would not need to search his favorite brand's website using browser, rather he can open my app and click on his favorit brand's image and will be redirected to official website or …

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HELP!! I have a windows server 2012 r2 . I can still use my server until i fell asleep and now woke up, And can't log in to my administrator account. I didn't change password at all, i use the same password and i'd make sure that it is correct. But still not working. Only i can access the guest account. I research and tried some tutorials but not working. I don't have installation CD and my physical back is already affected by AMNESIA file, can't copy because it needs admin rights. I found out that all of my files …

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Hi. I'm concerned an ex has installed spy software on my computer (and maybe iPhone, but that's for another thread). I've spent days reading about it and I'm not really any closer to figuring out if this is the case, and if so how to uninstall it. Any help would be much appreciated!

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I was just roaming the internet for some interesting reads and I came across [this very interesting paper](http://www.priv.gc.ca/information/research-recherche/2011/forcese_201107_e.asp) about how to define a legal framework for the "reasonable expectation of privacy" when it comes to our new cyber-existence. I thought I'd share it with you guys, and see what you think about agencies being able and allowed to collect and analyse huge amounts of data about any individual they like. The main point of the article is that the conventional wisdom that says that when you roam outside, in public places, you can't expect privacy (i.e., people (incl. authorities) could …

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A VPN, or Virtual Private Network to be formal, is a method of creating an encrypted data tunnel across the Internet from your device to a destination server. Although savvy home users and enterprises will operate their own VPNs (business-grade routers provide this functionality) for most folk, a VPN comes by way of a dedicated service provider. In theory, and as far as many of those VPN users are concerned, this provides them with both security and secrecy. People think that a VPN keeps them anonymous while online. People are more often than not wrong. What a VPN, any VPN, …

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How is it that the government that tells us that they need a back door into encryption because the tool that we use to safeguard our privacy can also be used by "bad guys" for evil purposes, completely forgets this argument when it comes to guns? "Yeah, bad guys use guns for bad things but there's nothing we can do." The right to bear arms (interpretation up to debate) and the right to privacy are both supposedly guaranteed in the constitution (amendments 2 and 4).

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**Do you anybody know when the full version of Windows 10 will arrived**

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The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has released the latest version of its 'Who Has Your Back?' [report](https://www.eff.org/who-has-your-back-government-data-requests-2015) and accompanying infographic, and it makes for interesting reading. Once you appreciate that what the EFF is talking about here is how good, measured as a response to a handful of yes or no questions, a bunch of leading tech companies are at protecting our data from government snooping requests. It's not about privacy in the larger scheme of things, just from that particular angle. That said, let's look at how the EFF came to the conclusions that can be seen in the …

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The recently revised Facebook community standards page states that the social network is on a mission "to give people the power to share and make the world more open" however it appears that it may have been giving the wrong people the power to share stuff you thought was private. According to security researcher and bug bounty hunter [Laxman Muthiyah](http://www.7xter.com/2015/03/how-i-exposed-your-private-photos.html) Facebook's photo sync feature came with a critical flaw which "allows any malicious Facebook application to read your mobile photos." The vulnerability concerns Facebook's Photo Sync feature for mobile users, which was introduced back in 2012 but because it was …

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In his essay '[A Few Thoughts on Cryptographic Engineering](http://blog.cryptographyengineering.com/2013/12/how-does-nsa-break-ssl.html)' Matthew Green, a cryptographer and research professor at Johns Hopkins University, asks "how the hell is NSA breaking SSL?" If this is news to you, following the Edward Snowden revelations in The Guardian, then you obviously haven't read the New York Times piece about the NSA 'Bullrun' [briefing sheet](http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/09/05/us/documents-reveal-nsa-campaign-against-encryption.html?_r=1&) which quite plainly states that the agency has been circumventing exactly the type of encryption protection of everyday Internet communications that we take for granted, such as SSL (Secure Sockets Layer). Of course, as Green has hinted at here, it's not the …

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Cancer is a terrible disease which it has claimed the life of a well known technology journalist and a well known coder within the last couple of weeks. Now Facebook has been diagnosed as being in the final stages of that online cancer which is a disregard for user privacy, and I think it is probably terminal. The issues have not gone unnoticed by the media, including the DaniWeb news team, with [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/news/story281329.html"]Ron Miller reporting[/URL] how some people are very unhappy with such things as the recent 'instant personalisation' feature that shares user activities as they move around the web, …

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With just about everybody snooping around your emails today with the excuse of hunting the bad guys, coding to keep some resemblance of privacy is getting important. I will start out with some simple encryption examples to get this started. You are invited to give us your thoughts and codes. Hopefully, we can improve the code as time goes on. The first example is very simplistic form of a Caesar cipher, simply increasing the ASCII values by one to encrypt and decreasing by one to decrypt. It would be easy to figure that scheme out by looking at the letter …

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According to the [Daily Mirror](http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/technology-science/technology/charlie-hebdo-isis-flag-death-4946579), a number of official websites connected to French municipalities were hacked at the end of last week to coincide with the Charlie Hebdo massacre and the hostage taking at the Jewish supermarket. The newspaper reported that the home screens of websites belonging to the towns of Jouy-le-Moutier, Piscop, Goussainville, Val D'Oise and Ezanville (all surrounding Paris) were defaced with a Jihadist ISIS black flag and a message which translates as "The Islamic State Stay Inchallah, Free Palestine, Death to France, Death to Charlie." The hacker concerned declares himself to be an Algerian using the name …

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I may be getting paranoid (at least my wife thinks so), but every time I hear/read about the internet of things, all that is said is how wonderful it will be to have everything interconnected and accessible from anywhere you happen to be. However, after all the revelations about the collection and misuse of meta data, it seems to me that the potential for abuse once my entire home is online is enormous. We already know what can be inferred from phone meta data. What inferences could be made when outside agencies know the frequency of use devices like my …

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American technology companies are by implication evil, and aiding terrorist groups such as Islamic State/ISIS according to a number of highly influential but terribly ill-informed Western players. Apple and Google have become the command and control networks of choice for terrorists and implementing full-device encryption by default will help Islamic State to plan future attacks, if we are to believe certain spy masters and career politicians. I use the term 'terribly ill-informed' wisely, and am aware that I will no doubt get plenty of flack from those who think the head of the UK Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) or Director …

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while mining medical data set privacy is a major concern.i want to mine medical data and preserve privacy.so i need to mine medical data and group them according to diseases so that it can be used for research and publishing without revealing patients information .i planned to use lkc privacy for protecting the personal information.so for grouping the data which techniques i use?classification algorithm/association /clustering??? which algorithm matches?which tool i need to use

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One of the biggest security stories so far this year is that of the high school that remotely triggered webcams in laptops given to students -- which the school said it only did to help track stolen laptops, and which some students and families said was a violation of their privacy, with the student in question [URL="http://www.toledofreepress.com/2010/02/25/advanced-parenting/"]filing [/URL]a class-action lawsuit. The school, Harriton in the Lower Merion School District, in a suburb of Philadelphia, said it has activated the cameras -- which parents reportedly didn't know about -- on 42 of the laptops. An extremely detailed [URL="http://strydehax.blogspot.com/2010/02/spy-at-harrington-high.html"]post [/URL]in a security …

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Amazon has, this week, revealed the first smartphone designed by the online retail giant in the shape of the Amazon Fire. Described by the company as featuring "two new breakthrough technologies that allow you to see and interact with the world through a whole new lens" and by some others as probably "the biggest single invasion of your privacy for commercial purposes ever." The innovations that have led to these two rather different takes are Dynamic Perspective and the Firefly Button. The first, Amazons informs us, is a sensor system that will respond to the way the user holds, views …

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The Onion Router, better known as the Tor Network, is often thought of as being the dark-side of the web. Not least as the anonymity provided by Tor meant that sites hosted on so-called hidden service servers were free to trade in just about anything from drugs and guns through to child pornography. In amongst the depravity and illegal excess, of course, were political activists and dissidents looking for an online safe haven in order to escape persecution, prosecution and potentially death. Revelations that the FBI would appear to have been behind the takedown of Freedom Hosting, apparently responsible for …

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lets suppose Gmail Allows one email account against one computer and they allow a desktop application to login to my email , so i created account using Chrome , now to create a second account with gmail if i Delete desktop login application alongwith all its registrery data/ dll files , use hotspot shield to hide my identity , restart my router to change my ip address , clear my browser history from all browsers and download some other browser like Safari etc . is there any possibility that Gmail may detect that this person has already created an account …

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Today is another of those 'Hallmark' IT security days; in the case of Tuesday the 11th of February 2014 that means 'Safer Internet Day'. I'm not going to start yet another rant about the pointlessness of this, and why every day should be Safer Internet Day. If you want to know my feelings, go and take a look at what I said in my article '[Data Privacy Day sucks elephants through a straw, and here's why...](http://www.daniweb.com/hardware-and-software/microsoft-windows/viruses-spyware-and-other-nasties/news/472024/data-privacy-day-sucks-elephants-through-a-straw-and-heres-why)' a couple of weeks ago. Instead, I'm going to concentrate on just what those of us who are in the business of trying to …

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Apparently it's Data Privacy Day tomorrow (January 28th) which, if you will allow me to quote the [Stay Safe Online](https://www.staysafeonline.org/data-privacy-day/about) website blurb, is an "international effort to empower and educate people to protect their privacy and control their digital footprint". Given the Edward Snowden NSA spying revelations that broke during the course of last year, and the fallout from the recent Adobe and Target breaches which is ongoing, I don't happen to follow the flock and agree that Data Privacy Day is a timely and important event. More quotes from Stay Safe Online simply fuel my anger on the subject: …

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[ATTACH=RIGHT]22094[/ATTACH]Facebook Vice-President Chris Cox has [announced](https://blog.facebook.com/blog.php?post=10150251867797131) the latest in a seemingly never ending run of privacy updates for the worlds' biggest social network. The improvements can be summed up as tightening up the question most often asked by those users worried about their privacy, namely "who can see this?" Unless the users asking that question happen to be using an iPhone it would seem. According to Cox the privacy updates, which will be rolled out to all users during the next few days, will make it "easier to share posts, photos, tags and other content with exactly the people you …

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A [Channel 4 News investigation](http://www.channel4.com/news/phone-mobile-data-24-hours-apps-security-secret) in the UK has revealed that in a 24 hour period just one smartphone made 350,000 requests to 315 different servers and made 30,000 requests to 76 servers when otherwise sitting totally idle for 45 minutes. Oh, and then there was the location data being sent to advertising agencies based overseas, and handset ID data heading to various apps. In fact, the investigation simply reiterated the fact that an average smartphone will send out hundreds of thousands of pieces of information every day, giving away its location and unique identity. ![8cf45ebf097b82f98333ede74e38961b](/attachments/large/0/8cf45ebf097b82f98333ede74e38961b.jpg "8cf45ebf097b82f98333ede74e38961b") Channel 4 News …

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Discount coupons are OK, but consumers consider drive-by location marketing an invasion of privacy. That's the warning message that research across four countries (US, UK, Mexico and India) by ISACA would appear to be flagging loud and clear to retailers wanting to maximise the marketing potential of customers with smartphones. ![9e672bce476015a5b10a7af7765c1643](/attachments/small/0/9e672bce476015a5b10a7af7765c1643.jpg "align-right") ISACA, which specialises in helping business get the most value while managing risk related to information and technology, asked more than 4,000 consumers about their holiday season shopping habits and their opinions on privacy. This revealed that shoppers in India and the UK were the most resistant to …

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Aggressive adware, of the kind that creates shortcuts on your screen or changes your search engine configuration, has arrived on Android devices and then some. According to security vendor Bitdefender, as much as 90% of free Android apps contain adware with up to 75% coming with the 'aggressive' variety. ![dweb-androidadware](/attachments/small/0/dweb-androidadware.jpg "align-right") Although adware on the PC has become something of a non-problem courtesy of better educated users and software solutions both within browser clients and third party solutions combining to make it relatively easy to deal with these days. The kind of pop-up creating adware most often seen on the …

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Gartner defines the '[Nexus of Forces](http://www.gartner.com/it-glossary/nexus-of-forces)' as being "the convergence and mutual reinforcement of social, mobility, cloud and information patterns that drive new business scenarios". The global IT analyst outfit has also just released details of research which suggests that the perceived level of maturity when it comes to the privacy activity of organisations has gone down since 2011, with many admitting their own existing privacy efforts are inadequate. Gartner insists that these companies need to refocus their efforts in order to deal with the impact of the Nexus of Forces. According to Carsten Casper, research vice president at Gartner, …

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When participants of a recent study were asked to share sensitive information on two different online surveys -- one designed to look unprofessional and the other backed by a major university -- the participants were more likely to share private information on the unprofessional-looking site.[ATTACH]16892[/ATTACH]Researchers from Carnegie Mellon released yesterday some of their [URL="http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2010-08/uocp-wdc082410.php"]findings[/URL], which will be published in the Journal of Consumer Research. The study found that "many consumers need help recognizing when their privacy is compromised," according to the release. "How can we make sense of the contradictory attitudes that individuals display toward privacy—from the seemingly reckless willingness …

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Well looks like Google (the company whose corporate motto is "Do no evil") was implicated by the Snowden leak as vastly co-operating with other Internet companies and the American government to find and collect as much international private data as possible about as many foreigners as posiible. Things like telephone calls made, emails sent and recieved, social network activities, web searches and subsequent web page visits ...). My question is about money. How much money was Google paid to spy on us for the Americans. Surely this incredibly heartless corporation did not barder our private lives out of the goodness …

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The End.