A rather interesting [URL="http://www.eetimes.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=206903246"]article in the EETimes[/URL] suggests that the holy grail of artificial intelligence, the ability to pass the Turing Test, may become a reality later this year courtesy of a collaboration between IBM and the [URL="http://www.rpi.edu/"]Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute[/URL]. The [URL="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turing_test"]Turing Test[/URL] was first described by Alan Turing back in 1950, and requires a human being acting as a judge to hold a natural language conversation with a machine and with another human being and not be able to tell which is which. So far, no machine has been able to pass this simple test. But now the AI …

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Anyone with an interest in the history of computing will know that the first mechanical computer was invented by one Charles Babbage, British mathematician and visionary. If you happen to be in the vicinity of the Science Museum in London you can even see a working difference engine, something Babbage never did in his lifetime as he died before a prototype could be completed. Amazingly, according to [URL="http://www.computerworld.com/action/article.do?command=viewArticleBasic&articleId=313000&intsrc=hm_list"]this story[/URL] a number of scientists in the US are now working once more on mechanical computers. Fair play, they are likely to weigh less then the two ton steampunk Babbage creation, a …

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Scientists at IBM have finally managed to get around the problem of electrical interference that prevented signals from working correctly while using the carbon mesh material of grapheme. It means that they can now get on with the job in hand of building nanoscale transistors according to this [URL="http://www.technewsworld.com/rsstory/62064.html"]report[/URL].

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How small can a laser get? Good question, and according to the physicists at the [URL="http://www.nist.gov/"]National Institute of Standards and Technology[/URL] (NIST) the answer is very small indeed, one single quantum dot small perhaps. To put this into some perspective, a typical microdisk laser of the type currently used in experiments by NIST and Stanford Univeristy is constructed of layers of indium arsenide on top of gallium arsenide, the resulting etched out diskj being 1.8 micrometers across and containing an average of 130 quantum dot islands of indium arsenide in each one. The newly developed micrometer-sized solid-state lasers see a …

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Some would say blue, given the amount of sex that can be found on the web. Others might go for black, thinking along the lines of increasing online crime. To many the whole idea of Internet technology is a grey area. But, my friends, thanks to researchers at the Chinese Academy of Science, the University of Leuven in Belgium and Washington State University, the answer could soon become a lot more black and white as they plan to dye the Internet to make it run faster. No, I have not been on the sherry again, this is a serious technology …

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A plague has swept the online universe of popular game World of Warcraft! Cities have been wiped out. Travel became a dangerous activity indeed. Online gamers returned from a nature call to find themselves amidst desolation! When Blizzard Software released the version 1.7 Patch for the online game they included a new event to join those already available, but it has had unforseen outcomes. Zul'grub, apparently, is a 20 person raid event in which groups of players can attack a perilous Troll city. Inside the City is Hakkar, God of Blood who has the uncanny ability to infect nearby players …

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The End.