While they have, in past years, enjoyed glorious recognitino such as the iconic ["Worst Company in America"](http://voices.washingtonpost.com/fasterforward/2010/04/comcast_wins_consumerist_worst.html) award, Comcast isn't letting its data-caps go away anytime soon, and while they have raised some of their caps in some markets, it's apparent the motive of the entire movement is far from bandwidth-related. Last month, Comcast stopped kicking around the idea of [data caps](http://arstechnica.com/business/2012/09/comcast-data-caps-hit-test-cities-range-from-300gb-to-600gb/) and instead pushed it into high gear, launching the capped services in various test markets, with limits ranging from 300GB to 600GB. The caps, designed to help quell bandwidth usage with their customers, seems to be suicidal from …

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What, in your opinion, is the best route to becoming a network engineer these days? Here are some observations on why I am asking this: - Software Defined Networking: With SDN becoming supported by so many vendors and implementations by large companies, it seems that it is surely going to become the norm a few years down the road. SDN takes all but the low level protocols off of the router and replaces it with an Openflow Agent and routes based on rules that are coded in (if I remember correctly) Python. In addition to learning the major network protocols …

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Ten percent of people working in the electronics and telecom sector have not read a book for pleasure in the last year. During the same 12 month period, 35 percent had not learnt a new activity or indulged in a new hobby either. According to the Department For Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) in the UK, an encouraging 60 percent did think that learning a new skill or taking up a new hobby would make them more confident at work. Photography led the way, with 18 percent wanting to learn that and 11 percent showing an interest in taking up …

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British Telecom has announced that it is ahead of schedule for superfast broadband* and will deliver it in time for the [URL="http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/8424401.stm"]Olympic Games in London[/URL]. It's less good that only 40 per cent of customers will be able to get at the service but then the Internet was ever thus. What's really interesting to me is that people still talk about the speed rather than what it can do when they're announcing these services. It's possibly the single least useful thing network providers actually do. According to my ISM I have an 8 meg service. No laughing at the back. …

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There’s a lot of news coming out of the technology sector today. Let’s start with Apple and the growing chorus among shareholders for an SEC review. Bloomberg has the story this morning, and it has to be at least slightly troublesome for the Apple brain trust. Says Bloomberg; "U.S. regulators are examining Apple Inc.’s disclosures about Chief Executive Officer Steve Jobs’s health problems to ensure investors weren’t misled, a person familiar with the matter said." "The Securities and Exchange Commission’s review doesn’t mean investigators have seen evidence of wrongdoing, the person said, declining to be identified because the inquiry isn’t …

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Internet Broadband subscribers are being peeled away by cable television and there’s really not much the phone companies can do about it, analysts say. That could move a lot of money around on Wall Street. According to Leichtman Research Group, cable companies added 887,000 high-speed Internet subscribers in the 2nd quarter of 2008 – about twice the number of new subscribers added in the same quarter of 2007. The firm says that 76% of new subscribers went to cable companies – a telling sign. According to Leichtman, cable companies now have 35.3 million broadband customers, compared with 29.7 million at …

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Is the Tel-Com industry going the way of the dinosaur? If worldwide trends in 2008 are any indication, that very well could be the case. Speaking of case, the tech industry research and analytical firm Heavy Reading is on it. In a study released this week entitled “Reinventing the Telco: A Heavy Reading Progress Report”, the firm concludes that while telecom companies continue to make investments in research and technologies, it’s not really clear how those investments are going to pay off. Writes Graham Finnie, chief analyst at HR: “Big telcos are continuing to invest huge sums in their networks: …

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Ugh. The tech meltdown turn toward the telecom sector this week, fixing its dark gaze on companies like AT&T, Verizon, and Sprint Nextel, among others. On Thursday, shares of telecommunications companies fell badly from the ongoing fallout amid credit concerns. The carnage was grim and deep. U.S. traded shares of Paris-based Alcatel-Lucent fell nearly 5 percent. Ciena Corp. fell ahead of its earnings report, scheduled for Friday. Novatel Wireless Inc. was an exception, as its shares rose more than 3 percent after the wireless modem maker said it will buy back up to $25 million of its stock through Sept. …

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The End.