Hi everyone, My friends and I are looking at getting a domain and hosting (at least vps or cloud, minimum). I would like to know everything I need to know before even handing our money over. I really don't want to break any laws in any countries, I want us to be legally protect and ensure no one else can take derivatives of our name. We wish to get a registered trademark soon, to assist stopping people from using our name and brand. I want us to have a scalable hosting solution, a few years down track we will run …

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I am not surprised that the Trademark Office has refused the application filed by Google in respect of the Nexus One smartphone trademark. What does surprise me, however, is that Google went ahead and chanced its arm with the application when a cursory search would have shown that a similar trademark was already in use and therefore likely to cause market and brand confusion if granted. That's certainly the conclusion that the Trademark Office itself has arrived at in issuing a Section 2(d) Refusal notice, on 'likelihood of confusion' grounds. Google filed its application in December 2009, while a whole …

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Keeping the Internet safe for satire, the World Intellectual Property Organization [URL="http://didglennbeckrapeandmurderayounggirlin1990.com/legal.php"]ruled[/URL] that the domain name glennbeckrapedandmurderedayounggirlin1990.com was not a violation of the conservative political commentator's intellectual property. The WIPO [URL="http://reporter.blogs.com/files/decision-d2009-1182.pdf"]ruling[/URL] "dismissed Beck's argument that Internet users could be confused by the domain name and its accompanying Web site," noted an NPR [URL="http://www.npr.org/blogs/alltechconsidered/2009/11/glenn_beck_loses_domain_name_d.html?sc=fb&cc=fp"]article[/URL]. "'Even a 'moron in a hurry,'" read the decision, quoting Eiland-Hall's attorney, "would not likely conclude that Complainant sponsored, endorsed or was affiliated with the website addressed by the disputed domain name."" Indeed, in an excellent example of the [URL="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Streisand_effect"]Streisand Effect[/URL], Beck's September lawsuit actually brought more …

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In what may be a first, a company has bought rights to a Facebook page -- in a bidding war, even. OraBrush, a company that makes tongue cleaners, has outbid Hershey's for the rights to the [URL="http://www.facebook.com/home.php#/pages/Kisses/35152599010?ref=s"]"Kisses"[/URL] public profile, according to the [URL="http://www.insidefacebook.com/2009/05/27/orabrush-buys-11-million-kisses-fans-marketers-actively-bidding-for-facebook-pages/"]Inside Facebook[/URL] blog. Pricing was not disclosed. The Kisses page has 1,158,002 fans, and every time the owner of the page posts something to it, it automatically appears on the status page of all its fans because it has "stream access." This means it's an easy way to advertise. "Facebook wants Pages to be authentic channels for brands …

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Looks like Google could be in deep water, along with the Open Handset Alliance and some 40 or so companies, over an apparent trademark infringement. Now you might think that there had been some pretty heavyweight due diligence before Google and the OHA determined to call the open source mobile phone operating system. And indeed, it would seem that Google had indeed made all the right noises to the US Patent and Trademark Office but unfortunately the PTO refused the trademark application after it determined the mark had been granted to a software development outfit by the name of Android …

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Long, long ago, when the net was flat and only geeks knew how to register domain names, a few savvy people started signing themselves up to own domain names like "www.mcdonalds.com," with the thought that, someday, McDonald's Corp. might want to be on the Internet and would offer them oodles of money to buy the name from them. Eventually, it was determined that URLs could be subject to trademark infringement, and people who had registered domain names in hopes of earning a windfall had to give them up to the registered trademark holder. (Which also meant that there were problems …

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It’s bad enough, as an individual, to discover that the domain name you wanted has been snapped up by some corporate pirate looking to make a mighty profit by sitting on it and selling it on. It is even worse when these cyber-squatters snap up a domain you had been using but somehow managed to let lapse by not renewing the registration in time. However, the problem gets a whole lot more complicated when you are a corporate whose brand and business is being devalued by a typo-squatter. Type-squatting is, as the name suggests, the practice of using the misspelling …

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Here we go with the mobile phone beat-down again: Cingular Wireless, in a move boiling over with distasteful corporate hubris, has had the unmitigated effrontery to announce that they are going to charge folks with "older phones" an additional five bucks a month (OK, $4.99, but who's splitting hairs here?) Now, it's not really the older phones they are targeting, but rather those based on the old, analog TDMA technology. Their reasoning for this is that they want to phase out their older, analog network, which isn't a problem in and of itself, but why beat down the customer in …

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The latest Merriam-Webster's dictionary update has ruffled a few feathers online. Not for the inclusion of Manga (noun: a Japanese comic book or graphic novel) nor ringtone (noun: the sound made by a cell phone to signal an incoming call) or even supersize (transitive verb: to increase considerably the size, amount, or extent of.) Could it possibly be mouse potato (noun: a person who spends a great deal of time using a computer) or himbo (noun: and attractive but vacuous man?). Nope, then surely unibrow (noun: a single continuous brow resulting from the growing together of eyebrows) or even soul …

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FEMA, the Federal Emergency Management Association committed acts of browser discrimination by only allowing people with Microsoft Windows and Internet Explorer 6.0 to file electronic claims in response to Hurricane Katrina. This means that if I was an affected citizen of the US, and had my Mac laptop with me and a valid internet connection, I could not file a claim. Nor could my friend running Linux who uses Firefox, or perhaps Konquerer. According to FEMA's website, at [url]http://www.fema.gov/help/registration_faq.shtm[/url] the minimum computer is a Windows unit with IE 6. No other OS / browser combination will be supported / available. …

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The End.