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Currently, I'm a computer science major, but my University offers two separate computer majors.

Information Technology and
Computer Science

I'm not that exceptional of a math student, and I've been told that Information Technology requires less math then a CS degree.

What worries me though is how far a degree in IT would get me compared to a CS degree.

I'm concerned about job security, salary, and the prestige of one degree to another.

In 30 years, would I still have a job if I switch to an IT degree? Do CS majors look "down" on an IT degree. Is salary better for one or the other?

I'm only a sophomore taking the intro computer classes so I still have plenty of time to switch, but I'd like some input from people in the field before I make an decisions.

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Last Post by Rashakil Fol
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    Narue 5,707   8 Years Ago

    >I've been told that Information Technology requires less math then a CS degree. Maybe to get the degree (I wouldn't know, I don't have a degree), but the kinds of jobs you'd get with either a CS or IT degree [I]will[/I] require math. Consider yourself warned. >What worries me though … Read More

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    Narue 5,707   8 Years Ago

    >How did you learn programming ? Practical experience. I taught myself the basics and expanded on that as I did projects. Programming is one of those fields where you don't need a degree, and it's easy (these days at least) to get started and go a long way without formal … Read More

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>I've been told that Information Technology requires less math then a CS degree.
Maybe to get the degree (I wouldn't know, I don't have a degree), but the kinds of jobs you'd get with either a CS or IT degree will require math. Consider yourself warned.

>What worries me though is how far a degree in IT would get me compared to a CS degree.
An IT degreee will get you just as a far as a CS degree will: the interview for your first real job. Beyond that it's all about experience.

>I'm concerned about job security, salary, and the prestige of one degree to another.
Job Security: If you're depending on your degree for job security, then you don't have any job security.

Salary: In reality a degree won't help your salary like it would, say, a teacher's. A rock star IT guy or programmer will command just as high a salary if he dropped out of high school as he would with a PhD in computer science, electrical engineering, mathematics, and quantum physics. Experience and ability rules in our field. The degrees and certifications are really just there to get a resume past the semi-automated sorting heuristics.

Prestige: I imagine you'd get more prestige with a CS degree than an IT degree, though it depends on what's involved in the degree. However, that kind of prestige is superficial and ultimately worthless. Please don't become a blowhard who flashes his education around but adds no real value to the world.

>In 30 years, would I still have a job if I switch to an IT degree?
The world is supposed to end in 2012, so probably not. Otherwise, unless global war sends us back to the stone age, technology will still be around and you'll still be in demand. :icon_rolleyes:

>Do CS majors look "down" on an IT degree.
I can pretty much guarantee that CS majors look down on people who switch to IT because there's less math.

>Is salary better for one or the other?
Last I checked, not only is there no salary for degrees, you actually have to pay for them. In the real world salary is dictated by the job you do and the area in which you do it. I would expect CS majors and IT majors to apply for different jobs, so making a salary comparison between CS and IT is like making a salary comparison between equally unrelated jobs (automotive engineer and mechanic, for example).

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>I've been told that Information Technology requires less math then a CS degree.
Maybe to get the degree (I wouldn't know, I don't have a degree), .

How did you learn programming ? You are so good for a programmer who doesnt have a degree.

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>How did you learn programming ?
Practical experience. I taught myself the basics and expanded on that as I did projects. Programming is one of those fields where you don't need a degree, and it's easy (these days at least) to get started and go a long way without formal education.

Votes + Comments
How did you learn pole dancing? You are so good for someone who doesn't have a degree in it.
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I'm not that exceptional of a math student, and I've been told that Information Technology requires less math then a CS degree.

Are you having trouble with the math in your CS classes, or are you speculating that you might have trouble?

What worries me though is how far a degree in IT would get me compared to a CS degree.

They point in different directions.

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I'm a freshmen in college right now. My college also offers two different types of degrees: CS and MIS.

What I know is that for here the CS major is that you have to take a few more math classes than the MIS major. I know for example you have to take CALC 1 sometime if your majoring in CS. Also the classes for CS deal with more programming and database stuff like that.

MIS classes deal with more networking, management, Microsoft word, and accounting. Stuff like that.

The only real difference between these two that I can tell is that the CS major is more math and science based and the MIS is more business side of things. Both of them will have their technical background, but one is for more of engineering such as hardware and stuff and MIS is more management in business like network administrator or something like that or an HR person.

This is how I take it. You basically need a degree in one of these now-a-days for any business, but it is more about what you can do instead of what you have.

Sorry if I stated something wrong, but this is how I see it.

-jdm

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The only real difference between these two that I can tell is that the CS major is more math and science based and the MIS is more business side of things. Both of them will have their technical background, but one is for more of engineering such as hardware and stuff and MIS is more management in business like network administrator or something like that or an HR person.

I would just look at MIS as an inferior degree for inferior people.

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