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If you experienced the clumsiness of Windows Vista, Unix or Linux is a breath of fresh air! We need a book titled:
"The Vista Haters' Handbook"

+1

I think Serkin missed the entire point of the Unix hater's handbook.

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If you experienced the clumsiness of Windows Vista, Unix or Linux is a breath of fresh air! We need a book titled:
"The Vista Haters' Handbook"

i agree, but microsoft is too a big company to be against to.

0

+1

I think Serkin missed the entire point of the Unix hater's handbook.

tell me what is the entire point of the book?

0

The book was meant to poke fun at Unix in a "good sport" way, not to be taken as literal hate.

0

The book was meant to poke fun at Unix in a "good sport" way, not to be taken as literal hate.

how did you come to that conclusion, did you even read the book?

0

Yes. Its a satirical piece.

i agree, but microsoft is too a big company to be against to.

At the time it was written, the UNIX vendors were more powerful than microsoft.

2

tell me what is the entire point of the book?

tell me, what is the entire point of this thread?

besides being a means for some random internet guy to air out his creepy obsession for a female user, while simultaneously demonstrating that he doesn't know anything about programming.

because anyone that would either (a) take the 20-year-old Unix Hater's Handbook as being some sort of serious critique in favor of Windows, or (b) use it as evidence that C++ is a "horrible language" .... that person is a gotdam fool.

Votes + Comments
damn straight
0

tell me, what is the entire point of this thread?

besides being a means for some random internet guy to air out his creepy obsession for a female user, while simultaneously demonstrating that he doesn't know anything about programming.

because anyone that would either (a) take the 20-year-old Unix Hater's Handbook as being some sort of serious critique in favor of Windows, or (b) use it as evidence that C++ is a "horrible language" .... that person is a gotdam fool.

read the book first you near sided.

0

I have read the book.
And let me tell you it was not more to just fill my daily humor.
It has some good joke-like interaction with the shell of *nix. Like this :

$make love
Do not know how to make 'love'
$sleep with me
bad character

There are lot more examples. The author is pointing on the behaviour of Unix shell that it doesn't check for typos.

But just tell me:-> if Unix is bad, what are the options? Pleas don't utter "Windows" because I have seen more ridiculous bugs in windows. Besides, windows are OS for 'normal' humans.

2

I have read the book.
And let me tell you it was not more to just fill my daily humor.
It has some good joke-like interaction with the shell of *nix. Like this :

$make love
Do not know how to make 'love'
$sleep with me
bad character

There are lot more examples. The author is pointing on the behaviour of Unix shell that it doesn't check for typos.

But just tell me:-> if Unix is bad, what are the options? Pleas don't utter "Windows" because I have seen more ridiculous bugs in windows. Besides, windows are OS for 'normal' humans.

Usually when i dont like something but i have to work with that thing, to get motivated i express my bad feelings about that to people, then they claim their opposite idea, then i get motivated by their supporting claims. I hate anything which is hard to do for no reason, but i learn how to love them when i am told properly. I said cheating must be supported because i hate when cheaters get better grades than me, then the opposing ideas from the forum motivated me not to do so. Then i gave an empty paper for that midterm exam, professor was stunned and frustrated with what i did, but i scheduled two appointments with him to understand hardware level parelllelism and its exploitation. After seeing the class got all bad grades, he decided to overwrite our midterm grades with what we get from our final grade.
So actually, i think about good things and bad things, when i cant decide what to choose i query others' mind. if i were to post cheating is bad, nobody would post anything for cons and pros, i chose to post it in opposite way to cause some sensation and it reached its goal. I dont like unix, but i have to like it, and this thread helps me.

Votes + Comments
I like your approach there. Cheers !!!
For the way you cause ripples ..... no, let me correct waves in this community.
0

>>I don't like Unix but I have to like it ...
Why?

the company i work for uses only AIX and HP/UX servers. I would rather have all windows servers though. The applications are very old and must be supported for a long while as they are for health care systems.

0

>>I don't like Unix but I have to like it ...
This shows you are power-less.
Why don't you read some OS development books and start developing your own OS ( better than Unix) rather than pulling this thread which wont lead you anywhere?

0

>>I don't like Unix but I have to like it ...
This shows you are power-less.
Why don't you read some OS development books and start developing your own OS ( better than Unix) rather than pulling this thread which wont lead you anywhere?

what does it have to do with being powerless sidarta?

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>>what does it have to do with being powerless sidarta
Its siddhant3s.
By the time I was posting my last comment, you have already posted the one above mine.

So your company uses Unix, and thus you're helpless to use the 'dirty' Unix.
I feel very sorry for you.

So, what are you intending with this (useless) thread?

I suggest you something, go to your Boss and give him a free copy of this book.
Lets see what happens!

0

>>what does it have to do with being powerless sidarta
Its siddhant3s.
By the time I was posting my last comment, you have already posted the one above mine.

So your company uses Unix, and thus you're helpless to use the 'dirty' Unix.
I feel very sorry for you.

So, what are you intending with this (useless) thread?

I suggest you something, go to your Boss and give him a free copy of this book.
Lets see what happens!

i did it already, he agreed that c++ sucks, it is not hard to persuade someone on c++ sucks.

Actually i dont refer to language when i say sucks, the development platform sucks. i wouldnt say c++ sucks when working with visual studio c++ project, rather unix programming tools sucks. But anyway i have some new unix e-books, i will feel more confident after reading them.
Unlike you sidarta, life in escense does not make much sense to me, and during those times everything i face feels unneccessary. all unneccessary complexities of our lives..
I cant stop questioning why universe exists rather than being nothing. When you are in that mood, unix feels so heavy :)
but i read that book sidharta, i was impressed at that time, but such spiritual enlightment end up as being a poor country whose citizens are competing with each other to become US citizens.
Now you can close this thread :) as my usual style, i am rambling off the topic(this reminds me rashakil fol, where is he now do you know?)

0

(Being very gently) It is siddhant3s
>>rather unix programming tools sucks.
Do you mean that you are not comfortable with shell?
So you want everything in GUI?
I don't see much in the point-and-click methodology of GUI systems. I rather would throw my mouse.
But again, it depends on personal taste.
C++ is of course a great language( you can say I am biased) .
But using C++ to write OSs( As one of your post mentioned) is certainly not a great idea ( this is what annoyed Linus)

>>I cant stop questioning why universe exists rather than being nothing.
That's a good habit. But tell me, isn't it unusual asking those things from humans whose answers are still unknown to humans. I would rather try to find out my self.

Your hate for Unix is reflected. But its such a sorry state for you that you want to discuss those things in which we can't help you.
You are doing great job by casting yourself to Unix.
Even if you don't like Unix, try to like it. You may want to go to a hypnotist so that your Unix-o-phobia is removed.

0

i said sidharta intentionally, your name is similar to that, the book was named siddhartha http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siddhartha_(novel), and you have such buda picture in your avatar. i dont know if meaning of Siddhant is similar to Siddhartha. Anyway, thanks for your reply, i will redirect my c++ questions to you from now on. It is good to know you are good at it.

0

[offtopic]
I guess you already know the meaning of the word Siddhartha from the url you posted.
Siddhant(a) in sanskrit means Theory. :)
[/offtopic]

0

>>Siddhant(a) in sanskrit means Theory.
Umm.... Since it my name. I have right to correct you. The perfect translation of 'siddhant' is 'principles'

>>redirect my c++ questions to you from now on.
You should perhaps start thread on the C++ forum where everyone can see your c++ problem. I am there most of the time. I would extend my help as far as possible.
>> It is good to know you are good at it.
I never told you.

0

[offtopic]
I guess you already know the meaning of the word Siddhartha from the url you posted.
Siddhant(a) in sanskrit means Theory. :)
[/offtopic]

no :) i didnt read the url i posted, i just post it not to make any typos for an indian name. mhm i read it it means :
"one who has found meaning (of existence)" or "he who has attained his goals". And what do you call just the opposite in that sanksrit language, by the way is this language like root of your current hindi language?

0

>>Siddhant(a) in sanskrit means Theory.
Umm.... Since it my name. I have right to correct you. The perfect translation of 'siddhant' is 'principles'

Ah! Right. Thanks for the perfect translation. :)

0

I am guessing he is still banned.

do you know why he is banned?
let's open a petition for him to be activated. he was an ambitious poster.

1

no :) i didnt read the url i posted, i just post it not to make any typos for an indian name. mhm i read it it means :
"one who has found meaning (of existence)" or "he who has attained his goals". And what do you call just the opposite in that sanksrit language, by the way is this language like root of your current hindi language?

Sanskrit is the root of many languages (including English). The word Mother comes from the sanskrit word "Mathru". There are so many word that I can't recall at the moment. I didn't opt for sanskrit when I was in school, so, I am not that fluent in that language.
Hmm.. This thread has taken a 360 degree turn from Unix to Sanskrit ? Eh ?

0

Well you can find the formal reason and the conspiracy theory both on this thread :- http://www.daniweb.com/forums/thread183273.html

There is no comnspiracy, the Dude deserved it, as did everyone else who gets banned. There is no conspiracy when the application of the law is universal.

We told him 3 times about piracy and about 2 spam, and each time he ignored the warnings, so he got a ban.

0

There is no comnspiracy, the Dude deserved it, as did everyone else who gets banned. There is no conspiracy when the application of the law is universal.

We told him 3 times about piracy and about 2 spam, and each time he ignored the warnings, so he got a ban.

Chill JB, I wrote "conspiracy theory" with just a light heart, no need for any justifications here :D .

0

Chill JB, I wrote "conspiracy theory" with just a light heart, no need for any justifications here :D .

just making sure no-one got the wrong end of the stick.

0

i read the book "Linux and the Unix Philosophy" and found it helpful, briefly it mentions following items.

The following are Unix philosophy which are considered as dogmas:

1. Small is beautiful. Small things have tremendous advantages over

their larger counterparts. Among these is the ability to combine
with other small things in unique and useful ways, ways often

unforeseen by the original designer.

2. Make each program do one thing well. By focusing on a single task, a

program can eliminate much extraneous code that often results in

excess overhead, unnecessary complexity, and a lack of flexibility.

3. Build a prototype as soon as possible. Most people would agree that

prototyping is a valuable element of any project. But whereas

prototyping is only a small part of the design phase under other

methodologies, under Unix it is the principal vehicle for generating

an effective design.

4. Choose portability over efficiency. When Unix broke new ground as

the first portable operating system of any significance, it was big

news. Today portability is taken for granted as a necessity in any

modern software design, an example of a tenet that has gained wide

acceptance on other systems besides Unix.

5. Store data in flat text files. The choice between portability and efficiency

addresses the value of portable code. Portable data is at least

as important as—if not more important than—portable code. Portable

data is the often-neglected part of the portability formula.

6. Use software leverage to your advantage. Many programmers have

only a superficial understanding of the importance of reusable code

modules. Code reuse helps one take advantage of software leverage,

a powerful concept that some Unix developers use to create numerous

applications in a comparatively short time.

7. Use shell scripts to increase leverage and portability. Shell scripts are

double-edged swords for enhancing both software leverage and

portability in a design. Whenever possible, writing a script instead

of a complete C program is the way to go.

8. Avoid captive user interfaces. Some commands have user interfaces

known to Unix developers as “captive” user interfaces. These prevent

the user from running other commands while the command is

in use, effectively making the user a captive to the system for the

duration of the command. In a graphical user interface world, such

interfaces would be called “modal.”

9. Make every program a filter. The fundamental nature of all software

programs is that they only modify data; they do not create it.

Therefore, they should be written to perform as filters since they are

filters.

The following are Unix philosophy which are considered as believes:


1. Allow the user to tailor the environment. Unix users like the ability

to control their environment—all of it. Many Unix applications

decidedly refrain from making decisions about styles of interaction

and instead leave the choices to the user. The idea here is to implement

mechanisms for doing things, not policies for how to do them.

Let users discover their own paths to computer nirvana.
2. Make operating system kernels small and lightweight. Despite the

never-ending push for new features, Unix developers prefer to keep

the most central part of an operating system small. They don’t

always succeed at this, but this is their goal.

3. Use lowercase and keep it short. Using lowercase characters is a

tradition in the Unix environment that has persisted long after

the reason for doing so disappeared. Many Unix users today use

lowercase commands and cryptic names because they want to, not

because they’re forced to anymore.

4. Save trees. Unix users generally frown on using paper listings. There

are good reasons for keeping all text online and using powerful tools

to manipulate it.

5. Silence is golden. Unix commands are notoriously silent when it

comes to producing detailed error messages. Although more experienced

Unix users consider this a desirable trait, many users of other

operating systems would beg to differ.

6. Think parallel. Most tasks can be broken down into a series of

smaller subtasks. These subtasks can then be run in parallel to

accomplish more in the same amount of time as one large task. A

significant amount of activity occurs around symmetric multiproc-

essing (SMP) designs today, an example of a general trend in the

computer industry towards parallelization.

7. The sum of the parts is greater than the whole. This tenet stems from

the idea that a large application built from a collection of smaller

programs is more flexible, and hence, more useful than a single large

program. The same functional capability may exist in both solutions,

but the collection-of-small-programs approach is the more

forward-looking of the two.

8. Look for the 90-percent solution. Doing 100 percent of anything is

difficult. Doing 90 percent is far more efficient and cost effective.

Unix developers often look for solutions that satisfy 90 percent

of the target user base, leaving the other 10 percent to fend for

itself.

9. Worse is better. Unix aficionados believe that a “least common

denominator” system is the one most likely to survive. That which is

cheap, but effective, is far more likely to proliferate than that which

is high quality and expensive. The PC-compatible world borrowed

this idea from the Unix world and is making quite a go of it. The

keyword here is inclusion. If something is accessible enough that it

can include virtually anyone, it is better than something that presents

itself as being “exclusive.”

10. Think hierarchically. Unix users and developers prefer to organize

things hierarchically. For example, the Unix directory structure was

among the first tree-structured architectures applied to file systems.

Unix has extended hierarchical thinking to other areas, such as

network service naming, window management, and object-oriented

development.

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