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hi, I'm new here and i like this site. Anyway, how do i program in HTML, CSS, PHP, MYSQL, C, C+, C++, whatever i would need to know and what can i use it in when i'm done learning? Thanks. Bye.

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Last Post by GriffIT34
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Your best bet, since you seem to not really know much about it, would be to take an intro to programming class. Maybe something like Intro to C or Visual Basic. They tend to explain the basic principles of programming. All of the different languages you mentioned can be used in different situations and have different applications. You could get books for every single language, but before you do that, I would recommend a class. Even if some people are scared of them, they are useful. I think that applies to a class in C++ as well :D.

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Your best bet, since you seem to not really know much about it, would be to take an intro to programming class. Maybe something like Intro to C or Visual Basic. They tend to explain the basic principles of programming. All of the different languages you mentioned can be used in different situations and have different applications. You could get books for every single language, but before you do that, I would recommend a class. Even if some people are scared of them, they are useful. I think that applies to a class in C++ as well :D.

Thanks. For a class could i get a free tutorial online that teaches everything what you mentioned?

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Hi,

So you want to program? Good. It can be extremely rewarding but also extremely frustrating. But it is common for the best rewards to come with the highest risk. I'm a self taught programmer so I know what you are facing and I wish you every luck.

That said I recommend you start with: 1. definitely a book or 2. a class. There are tutorials all over the internet but they are rarely comprehensive and you have no experience yet to know when you are reading a crock of shit (like most of my articles) or something worthwhile. By starting with a book you are guaranteed a good start and it will be a source of constant reference to give you comfort when things start to get complicated. You need to look at two main areas: 1. Computers in general (their history and how they basically work) 2. And then programing languages. Strongly recommend some form of BASIC to start with.

There is range of books for dummies, most libraries stock these they are a fantastic resource.

Then you can go where you like from there, the skys the limit.

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I suggest you start by learning a language such as C++. I would start by purchasing a good intro book (and there plenty of them out there). HTML, and CSS you can learn in parallel since their concepts are a bit different from programming (however, they are pretty easy to grasp)

One thing though. If you seriously want to learn programming you need to have a great deal of patience, and the desire to practice. If you have those two, you should not have any problems.

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I never recommend starting with C++ until you have some experience. Mainly because all the tutorials and books I have read are shamefully skimpy on the subject of compilers and the compile and linking process, which in theory is simple but in practice is a headache.

In fact it was around the time I started learning C++ I realised what a pile of saucepans the whole Computing thing is really, all these layers of abstraction teetering precariously on one concept:
There's a voltage, there isn't a voltage. Which is why when I see all these Linux V's Windows and <insert fave language here> Vs <insert most hated language here> articles and posts I just laugh. They are entertaining though.

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I never recommend starting with C++ until you have some experience. Mainly because all the tutorials and books I have read are shamefully skimpy on the subject of compilers and the compile and linking process, which in theory is simple but in practice is a headache.

In fact it was around the time I started learning C++ I realised what a pile of saucepans the whole Computing thing is really, all these layers of abstraction teetering precariously on one concept:
There's a voltage, there isn't a voltage. Which is why when I see all these Linux V's Windows and <insert fave language here> Vs <insert most hated language here> articles and posts I just laugh. They are entertaining though.

Hi,

What are some good tutorials and books should i get? If not C++ first then what language first to what language last?

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A intro class won't teach you anything. Grab a book and study yourself.

It really depends, if the course is taught well, it can be helpful.

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If you can afford it, everything I do revolves around a tight budget. I just started reading these threads cause I want to learn programming. Amazons got some C++ books for $10-$20. I've gotta go at it alone.

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In my personal opinion starting with C++ is an incredibly bad idea.

Go grab Python or Ruby and play for a bit. Both have plenty of primer material available for them online.

Once you have played with either for a while go grab yourself a copy of MySQL and figure out what the database thing is all about.

Then grab yourself a copy of Apache and figure out how you go about setting up a website.

Then with your choice of either Python or Ruby build a simply web application driven off MySQL.

Now you are at a point where you can consider how you might like to go about learning to program and I would suggest you consider looking Java or C# then look at C/Lisp/Prolog in no particular order.

The database driven web application is for no particular reason other than it's motivational to drive toward something at least vaguely useful that you can develop on your home system and might actually leave you with a couple of skills of use to you.

You aren't about to get a job coding C++ any time soon.... down the road looking at C (not C++) might provide you with some insight but is unlikely to ever feature on any CV you may end up offering.

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Thanks for the info, i've done some research and found alot about python
and I think I'm going to start with that, I couldn't find much on ruby

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Let me ask, what can learning to program due to help me. I'm under the impression it will just give me a better understanding of how to fix problems or whats wrong or create something myself. But specifically is it that i'll be able to create any app that I want (in theory) or how bout drivers can I tweak or create drivers if I learn alot of programing????

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If you learn enough it means you can make that OS really sing baby !!

You can get paid to be creative and for some people that's like being paid to enjoy yourself.

It doesn't matter if it's programming or snorkeling, if you're learning all the time and taking an interest in all you can, if nothing else it will earn you friends, open opprtunities and allow you to be the best you can be and perhaps even to solve the maze and to know thyself!

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MR. Philosophy, i like it. I'm someone who took a while to find something I like, Im 25 and about 1yr into the IT industry, so I'm still a beginner but I learn fast, and your right work is enjoyment for me. I used to HATE my job, but now I like going to work, solving problems, building/creating stuff. All of my knowledge is hardware and networking. I feel Im missing part of the puzzle so I want to learn programming and understand how it all comes together.

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