and originated from verb "to snap"? (let's forget about the fish named Snapper)

This online dictionary gives several definitions for the word 'snapper'.

See points 4 & 5 from the Collins English Dictionary:

snapper [ˈsnæpə]
n pl -per, -pers
1. (Life Sciences & Allied Applications / Animals) any large sharp-toothed percoid food fish of the family Lutjanidae of warm and tropical coastal regions See also red snapper
2. (Life Sciences & Allied Applications / Animals) a sparid food fish, Chrysophrys auratus, of Australia and New Zealand, that has a pinkish body covered with blue spots
3. (Life Sciences & Allied Applications / Animals) another name for the bluefish or the snapping turtle
4. a person or thing that snaps
5. (Miscellaneous Technologies / Photography) Informal a person who take snapshots; photographer Also called (for senses 1, 2) schnapper

and originated from verb "to snap"?

"to snap" means to break in half, such as snap a twig (small tree limb). It could also mean to rub the thumb and middle finger together to make a noise -- snap you fingers. People who do those things are not usually called snappers.

growing up ,A girl in my neighbourhood had a thing, that all the guy who knew her well called a snapper

"to snap" means to break in half, such as snap a twig (small tree limb). It could also mean to rub the thumb and middle finger together to make a noise -- snap you fingers.

It can also mean to go crazy. "I don't what's wrong with him, he just snapped."

I'm sure that "to snap" has many other regional-dialect meanings in various parts of the world. I think Xantipius will have to clarify what meaning he is referring to. I think I have also heard "to snap something" as meaning "to steal something".

I have never heard the term "snapper" being used.

I think I have also heard "to snap something" as meaning "to steal something".

That's "to snatch" not "to snap"

Have seen it used as a part of a clothing dome set - the cap that snaps on.

Growing up, a girl in my neighbourhood had a thing that meant all the guys who knew her well called her a slapper. One for the brits there methinks... ;)

I've only heard snapper being used in with the "bite quickly/loudly" meaning of "to snap".
eg. That dog is a snapper.

That dog is a snapper.

Haha =)
Actually in Russian also there is no word "snapper".
There is word "kusaka" = "snapper". "kusat'" means "to bite",
but this word meant for using by little children only

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diafol

Growing up, a girl in my neighbourhood had a thing that meant all the guys who knew her well called her a slapper. One for the brits there methinks... ;)

Ho ho. Got there before me :)

There are a lot of words that are not in the English language so we steal them for out own use - that is how languages grow. Like a famous president said "the French don't have a word for entrepeneur".

Someone asked a really interesting question: "how do you say 'voilà' in your language" - almost every language had imported the word because it was so useful.

On the other hand, no matter what language the locals speak "no problem" said with a smile will get you out of almost any difficulty.

Snapping turtle is sometimes called snapper.

Red Snapper vs Bloody Mary
I like more the first name for the cocktail, but the 2nd one won over it.
http://in.reuters.com/article/2008/12/01/idINIndia-36812420081201

For a while, the cocktail was called a Red Snapper because the term "bloody" was considered rude.
Joe DiMaggio and Ava Gardner enjoyed the drink, as did a number of U.S. presidents.

Bradley corrected an impression about the origins of the drink's name. It has nothing to do with the 16th Century Queen Mary I of England, Bradley said, but rather comes from a customer's fond memory of a waitress named Mary who worked at a Chicago bar called the Bucket of Blood.

More than a million Bloody Marys are served daily in the United States, said Martin Silver, President of Georgi Vodka Co. and the Tri-State Hospitality Association.