Hi guys I have an image that I need to resize for a website without losing any of the quality. The image has a .gif extention and when I have scaled the image down using GIMP the image goes a bit fuzzy. Do you know any software or method to resize an image without losing any of the quality of the image?

If your image is bigger in size then it wont lose the quality when you squeezed and if your image is smaller in size then sure it will lose the quality when you make it to bigger size. No of pixels in your image is low and also it was a gif image. It is not possible to get a good quality. Create a new one with larger size and make it small to your convenient

i think u could do Photoshop bt only if image is bit larger one,if u r trying for small ones automatically image gets blurred as v r almost zooming it..so better take same pic if available again n do apply the free transform tool as per ur reqiurement

Thanks guys for your help and suggestions. Graphics is a weak point for me and so I am open to any recommendation of books or programmes to produce images better. So although you guys have answered my original question I am going to leave the thread open for a bit to see if anyone else has anymore suggestions for programmes or books. After a few of them I will mark it as solved.

No need of any books for creating a good graphics, if you are using the genuine own graphic from your digital camera. Then you make the resolution and width* height of the image to capture in high quality. Then you import the image into system and make your changes whatever you need. Use photoshop for image editing purpose. Check with JPEG for high quality image, PNG to support transparent images and gif for some lower resolution content.

Try to use this picture resizing tool It works well!

There is a plugin for Photoshop called Genuine Fractals...which makes the best resizes I have ever seen

Well, I have had good luck with changing the colorspace to RGB before resizing and then going back to the index colorspace when dealing with images.

It gives me a much smoother transition and less of the jagged bitmapping (since it works with a larger color gamut (range) and isn't forcing the reduction to happen in a very specific (indexed) color range.)

Good link explaining the color space differences.

Rajar pretty much covered the spectrum. I use Photoshop CS4 and Xara Designer Pro. The latter is a combo drawing/photo/web design app that I love, and the more I use it the less I'm using PS. You can resize down very successfully, but you can go too far in that direction also. You can upsize a tiny bit, but be especially watchful going in that direction. I would shoot as large or the second largest format in the the camera, crop to balance and get rid of unnecessary outside space then reduce. With each reduction you might have to hit the "Sharp" one or even two times in the process. If you go too far just undo. You might have to play with it to get a good feel. My understanding is that Gimp is akin to PS, so it should have a "Sharp." And definitely go from Index to RGB. Some excellent posts on this one.
Giddyup

just change the resolution in Photoshop if the pic is larger.

In photoshop: click on image --> click image size ---> change pixel dimensions (height and width) to desired size...

If you want to keep original image quality, you can only make the image smaller, not larger...

Large image don't loose their quality when you scale them but small image loose their quality. You can try "save for web option" it may helps you more then just general scaling. Format is also one of problem while dealing with images.

i think from adobe photoshop go to image image size then from their mark the resample image and change the resolution and size

Rajar pretty much covered the spectrum. I use Photoshop CS4 and Xara Designer Pro. The latter is a combo drawing/photo/web design app that I love, and the more I use it the less I'm using PS. You can resize down very successfully, but you can go too far in that direction also. You can upsize a tiny bit, but be especially watchful going in that direction. I would shoot as large or the second largest format in the the camera, crop to balance and get rid of unnecessary outside space then reduce. With each reduction you might have to hit the "Sharp" one or even two times in the process. If you go too far just undo. You might have to play with it to get a good feel. My understanding is that Gimp is akin to PS, so it should have a "Sharp." And definitely go from Index to RGB. Some excellent posts on this one.
Giddyup. You can also see the answers on this [removed]