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Hi,
does anyone know of any sites where I can read up on the defination, cause and solution of HTML dangling.
Regards
TetuGal

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Last Post by TetuGal
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I've never heard of it either. I can only assume it means that your HTML tags don't line up? I really don't know ... For all things HTML, my first bet would be the www.w3c.org - the World Wide Web Consortium.

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Hey,
thank you for your help, I have looked at W3C schools and cannot find anything on HTML dangling. I guess I will have to keep looking.
Happy New Year.

Regards
TetuGal

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Are you sure there IS such a thing? Can you explain it to me, so that maybe I can help you further?

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Hello,

I found this on an exam paper I am revising with. its in the section of hypertext linksThe question is:
What is the problem of "HTML dangling". Give the key points of the solution to this problem: Uniform Resource Name.

Regards
TetuGal

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Well, given that at least 2 seasoned Web Developers with likely over 30+ years combined experience have never even heard of the term, I would say the exam is screwy. Even the term "Universal Resource Name" is a bit off. There are URIs and URLs, (Universal Resource Indicators & Universal Resource Locators), but not URNs.

If you are revising the exam, just strike that question entirely.

Also, be careful what you end sentences, err,... with.

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Hi,
does anyone know of any sites where I can read up on the defination, cause and solution of HTML dangling.
Regards
TetuGal

Seems "HTML Dangling" doesn't quite ring the bell, I'm afraid, however, you might like trying the website below, pretty much covering "Advanced HTML".

http://www.jalfrezi.com/iniframe.htm

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Like I said, I am thinking that perhaps it means that you have extra tags that don't belong - for example, you opened a tag you never closed or vice versa. It could also mean incorrectly nested tags.

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here is a defination from www.whatis.com about a URN

"A URN (Uniform Resource Name) is an Internet resource with a name that, unlike a URL, has persistent significance - that is, the owner of the URN can expect that someone else (or a program) will always be able to find the resource. A frequent problem in using the Web is that Web content is sometimes moved to a new site or a new page on the same site. Since links are made using Uniform Resource Locators (URLs), they no longer work when content is moved.
A URN looks something like a URL. For example, here's a hypothetical URN:

urn:def://blue_laser"

Thanks for all your help, someone has suggested that I look at dangling links or broken links as they think thats what the exam paper is referring to. Will also look at the link you provided.

Regards
TetuGal

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