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Last Post by piapoco
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The hostname "localhost" is actually an alias which always refers to the local computer (local host). No matter where you access localhost, you'll be accessing the curent machine you're using at the time. 127.0.0.1 is the IP alias for localhost - they all mean the same thing.

What you will need to access your machine from elsewhere is an external IP (preferably static) that was assigned either by your router (to access your computer from other sites within your network) or by your ISP.

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Dear Admin
In fact I just found the solution. in httdf.con file I ve changed the access type from "allow from localhost 127.0.0.1" to "allow from all" so when I change this access type I can reach the web page in intranet using server's ip address.
P.S;I know that changing this access type is dangereous for security but Im using apache in intranet
Thanks for your reply
Best
Hakan

The hostname "localhost" is actually an alias which always refers to the local computer (local host). No matter where you access localhost, you'll be accessing the curent machine you're using at the time. 127.0.0.1 is the IP alias for localhost - they all mean the same thing.

What you will need to access your machine from elsewhere is an external IP (preferably static) that was assigned either by your router (to access your computer from other sites within your network) or by your ISP.

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I have a problem similar to this. My website (development stage) depends on http://localhost. Now I'm beginning to use Zend Server, which forces the server to use http://localhost:10083. How can I use this new combination without changing all my code? Something in the way of an alias?

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